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Infertility research studies for holistic treatments

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized
treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered
from their problems after infertility treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit
of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of infertility and related therapies
as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

/ title=”Differences in bisphenol A and estrogen levels in the plasma and seminal plasma of men with different degrees of infertility.”>
Differences in bisphenol A and estrogen levels in the plasma and seminal plasma of men with different degrees of infertility.

December 2014

The general population is potentially exposed to many chemicals that can affect the endocrine system. These substances are called endocrine disruptors (EDs), and among them bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most widely used and well studied. Nonetheless, there are still no data on simultaneous measurements of various EDs along with steroids directly in the seminal fluid, where deleterious effects of EDs on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis are assumed. We determined levels of BPA and 3 estrogens using LC-MS/MS in the plasma and seminal plasma of 174 men with different degrees of infertility. These men were divided according their spermiogram values into 4 groups: (1) healthy men, and (2) slightly, (3) moderate, and (4) severely infertile men. Estradiol levels differed across the groups and body fluids. Slightly infertile men have significantly higher BPA plasma and seminal plasma levels in comparison with healthy men (p

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/ title=”Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.”>
Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

January 2016

Triclosan (2,4,4′-trichloro-2′-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient ? = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (? = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (? = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

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/ title=”Phytoestrogens may improve the pregnancy rate in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles: a prospective, controlled, randomized trial.”>
Phytoestrogens may improve the pregnancy rate in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles: a prospective, controlled, randomized trial.

December 2004

OBJECTIVE:
To compare the effectiveness of i.m. P and i.m. P plus oral phytoestrogens for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF-ET cycles.
DESIGN:
Prospective, controlled, randomized trial.
SETTING:
University Hospital, Perugia, Italy. PATIENT(S): Two hundred thirteen infertile patients undergoing IVF-ET were included in the study. The inclusion criteria were use of a GnRH agonist for pituitary down-regulation and age <40 years. The total number of cycles performed was 274. INTERVENTION(S): Patients were assigned to receive either i.m. P (50 mg daily) plus placebo or P (50 mg daily) plus phytoestrogen supplementation (1,500 mg daily) for luteal phase support starting from the evening of oocyte retrieval until either a serum pregnancy test result was negative or embryonic heartbeat was sonographically confirmed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The outcomes of IVF-ET were evaluated in both study groups in terms of implantation rate, biochemical pregnancy rate (PR), clinical PR, spontaneous abortion rate, and ongoing pregnancy/delivered rate. RESULT(S): Statistically significant higher values for implantation rate, clinical PR, and ongoing pregnancy/delivered rate were recorded in the patients who received P plus phytoestrogens for luteal phase support in comparison with patients receiving P and placebo. CONCLUSION(S): Although the results of this study encourage the use of phytoestrogens for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF-ET program, more studies are necessary to support the hypothesis that phytoestrogens have a beneficial effect in IVF cycles.

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/ title=”Antioxidant activity of N-acetylcysteine, flavonoids and alpha-tocopherol on endometrial cells in culture.”>
Antioxidant activity of N-acetylcysteine, flavonoids and alpha-tocopherol on endometrial cells in culture.

November 1998

An appropriate local environment is necessary for successful implantation. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of several pathologies, and may contribute to early pregnancy failure. Antioxidant therapies have been studied in infertility. In this study, we have assessed the antioxidant activity of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), flavonoids (quercetin, catechin) and alpha-tocopherol in an oxidative model of endometrial cells (RL95). Endometrial cells were incubated at several hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Antioxidant effects of NAC (15 mM), quercetin (150 microM), catechin (150 microM) and alpha-tocopherol included in liposomes (1.6 microg) were assessed by measuring cell viability by the MTT assay. Alpha-tocopherol-liposomes taken up by endometrial cells were assessed by HPLC. All liposomes used were able to introduce alpha-tocopherol into cells. The antioxidant effect of NAC and quercetin improved the viability of oxidised cells, and this effect was observed when the oxidant and antioxidant were coincubated. No viability change occurred when the antioxidant was added before or after the oxidant. The antioxidant effect of NAC was better than that of quercetin. When catechin or alpha-tocopherol were used in the same conditions, no antioxidant effect was detected in cells in culture. These results demonstrate that NAC and quercetin are good H2O2 scavengers.

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/ title=”Administration of B-group vitamins reduces circulating homocysteine in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients treated with metformin: a randomized trial.”>
Administration of B-group vitamins reduces circulating homocysteine in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients treated with metformin: a randomized trial.

June 2005

Background:
The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of B-group vitamins and folic acid administration on serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy) in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) on short-term metformin treatment.
METHODS:
Patients were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. Group 1 patients (n = 20) received metformin (850 mg twice daily); group 2 patients (n = 20) received metformin (850 mg twice daily) and B-group vitamins (vitamin B1, 250 mg; vitamin B6, 250 mg; vitamin B12, 1000 microg twice daily); and group 3 patients (n = 20) received metformin (850 mg twice daily) and folic acid (174 microg twice daily). In all groups, lipid profiles and plasma total Hcy, vitamin B12, folic acid and glucose levels were recorded at baseline and at 3 months.
Results:
A 26.5% increase in Hcy levels was seen after 12 weeks of metformin therapy, while 21.17 and 8.33% decreases in Hcy levels were detected when B-group vitamins or folic acid plus metformin were given respectively. There were no statistically significant differences recorded in insulin sensitivity using homeostasis model assessment in the three groups.
Conclusion:
These findings suggest that B-group vitamins and folic acid administration counteract the Hcy-increasing effect seen with metformin therapy.

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/ title=”Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.”>
Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

July 2005

The innate immune system of mammals provides a rapid response to repel assaults from numerous infectious agents including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. A major component of this system is a diverse combination of cationic antimicrobial peptides that include the alpha- and beta-defensins and cathelicidins. In this study, we show that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and three of its analogs induced expression of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene. This induction was observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), immortalized keratinocyte, and colon cancer cell lines, as well as normal human bone marrow (BM) -derived macrophages and fresh BM cells from two normal individuals and one AML patient. The induction occurred via a consensus vitamin D response element (VDRE) in the CAMP promoter that was bound by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Induction of CAMP in murine cells was not observed and expression of CAMP mRNA in murine VDR-deficient bone marrow was similar to wild-type levels. Comparison of mammalian genomes revealed evolutionary conservation of the VDRE in a short interspersed nuclear element or SINE in the CAMP promoter of primates that was absent in the mouse, rat, and canine genomes. Our findings reveal a novel activity of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and the VDR in regulation of primate innate immunity.

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