Top Integrative Treatments For Diet-Therapy

Research therapy options reviewed by experts, researchers and other patients. See what people thought about their experiance and outcomes.Read their stories and therapy ideas.Do you have a personal story to share about what worked for your condition? Share your journey so others can heal.

162 Case Studies
123 Member Stories
1538 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Anxiety Disorders

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Specific therapies and drugs can help alleviate the burden of anxiety, yet only about a third of people suffering from this illness seek treatment. Diet has a vital role in helping to deal with anxiety. Besides healthy guidelines like eating a balanced diet, drinking enough water to stay hydrated, and limiting or avoiding caffeine and alcohol, there are quite a few other dietary considerations which may help relieve anxiety. As an example, complex carbohydrates are metabolized more slowly and help maintain a more even blood sugar level. This stable sugar level generates a calmer feeling.

A diet comprising of whole grains, fresh vegetables, and fruits is a healthier choice than eating a lot of simple carbohydrates found in processed foods. When you eat is also vital. Do not skip meals. Doing this may lead to drops in blood sugar that allow you to feel jittery, which might worsen the underlying anxiety. The gut-brain axis is crucial since a large percentage (about 95 percent) of serotonin receptors are found in the gut lining. Research is investigating the potential of probiotics for treating both depression and anxiety. Effective anxiety management entails your diet. When you haven't tried tweaking everything you eat, then you might be missing a significant opportunity to beat back your nervousness. Doctors and dietitians are beginning to know more about how the nutritional properties of the foods we eat affect the brain. Research shows a clear and significant relationship between the brain and the gut, referring to the gut as the next brain. When essential nutrients aren't sufficiently available, there's a direct influence on the production of hormones and brain chemistry, which may increase or lessen anxiety-related behaviors. The most important dietary change for anybody who has the anxiety to create is to plan meals around foods that are whole, lowering or eliminating processed foods such as sugary and junk foods. The dietary alterations you can make are as comfortable as swapping out foods.  Prevent binge-eating your go-to comfort foods (which only leave you feeling guilty and more anxious) and enjoy healthy superfoods with mood-boosting properties. 

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148 Case Studies
94 Member Stories
1539 Research
145 Case Studies
114 Member Stories
2571 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Cancer Care

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There's more to nutrition during cancer and cancer therapy than counting calories, protein, and carbs. The foods you choose can help you cope with many side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, chewing and swallowing difficulties, and taste changes. As each person's medical background and diagnosis is different, so is the response to treatment. Side effects can be severe, mild, or absent. Make sure to discuss with your healthcare team any/all potential side effects of treatment before the treatment starts. Side effects include nausea, diarrhea, constipation, chewing or swallowing, taste alterations, and bloating.

People with cancer want to keep a healthy body weight and consume nutritious foods. Sometimes the side effects of cancer treatment can cause a person to eat less and eliminate weight. Losing weight without trying could make you weak and malnourished. Some other cancer therapies can lead to weight gain. Here are some general nutrition recommendations for individuals receiving cancer therapy:

• Keep a healthy weight. For lots of people, this means preventing weight loss by getting enough calories daily. For men and women that are obese, this may mean losing weight. Ask your healthcare team if you should attempt to lose weight during treatment. It might be better to wait till after treatment, so you have all of the nutrition you will need to keep strong. Should you try to drop weight during treatment, it needs to be moderate, meaning just about a pound per week.

• Get essential nutrients. These include carbohydrates, protein, fats, and water.

• Be as busy as possible. Have a daily walk. If you sit or sleep too much, you might lose muscle mass and increase your body fat, even when you aren't gaining weight.

Nutrition counseling may help individuals with cancer get essential nutrients, such as protein, vitamins, and minerals. It may also help them maintain healthy body weight. Many side effects can make it hard to eat or drink. For nutrition counseling, it is essential to go to a qualified professional. This implies a registered dietitian (RD) or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN).

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141 Case Studies
94 Member Stories
1537 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Constipation

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In-office & online

There may be lots of potential causes of constipation. Commonly, a deficiency of dietary fiber, not getting enough fluids and low levels of physical activity might increase the risk. Other causes could include health conditions like celiac disease or irritable bowel syndrome. Sometimes certain medications or supplements can lead to constipation, such as prescription medication for depression, pain management, higher blood pressure, and Parkinson's disease. Over-the-counter drugs, such as iron and calcium supplements, allergy medications, and antacids with aluminum, may also raise your chance of becoming constipated.

Occasionally people rely on laxatives and enemas to help keep their bowel movements regular. These over-the-counter remedies stimulate bowel movements. However, using both of these remedies too often may weaken your bowel's capacity to work normally. Utilizing both laxatives and enemas too often may cause constipation.

As laxatives and enemas can do harm to your intestines, so might restricting or holding bowel movements when you must go. Maintaining a bowel movement beyond the normal urge can impact normal muscle functioning and contribute to constipation. Consuming various foods that have dietary fiber, like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, together with adequate fluid intake, can help keep your bowel movements regular and prevent constipation. Limit foods that are lower in fiber, like highly processed and prepared foods by replacing them with high fiber options. This should be done slowly and while increasing fluid intake.

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171 Case Studies
110 Member Stories
1584 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Depression

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Several factors can contribute to depression. There could be inherent biochemical or psychological problems that predispose someone to depression. There could be a cause, such as a stressful event or grief. Exercise is also crucial, and there is plenty of evidence that regular exercise boosts mood, especially if you're ready to exercise outdoors. 

Foods That Help With Depression: Whatever your dietary preferences, you will find an assortment of choices that can offer mood-boosting benefits. You will still need to reevaluate your eating habits and just eat these foods, but being mindful of which foods affect your mood can help you better handle depression symptoms.

Raise Your omega-3 fats: Omega-3 fats can not be manufactured within the body, and for that reason, you must take them through your diet. The richest dietary source is from fatty fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel, pilchards, herring, trout, and fresh but not tinned tuna. Studies have shown that the more fish the populace of a state eats, the lower is their incidence of depression. There are two important kinds of omega-3 fats, EPA and DHA, and the evidence indicates that it is the EPA that is the most potent natural antidepressant. Numerous studies are demonstrating the benefit of omega 3 in depression.

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186 Case Studies
110 Member Stories
1624 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Diabetes: Type II

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A diabetes diet is an eating plan naturally rich in nutrients and low in calories and fat. Key elements of the diet are fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. A diabetes diet is typically the best eating plan for almost everyone.

Why do you need to develop this type of healthy eating plan? If you have diabetes, your doctor will probably recommend that you find a dietitian to assist you in creating a diabetic diet plan. This helps you control your blood sugar and control heart disease risk factors, such as weight, high blood pressure, and high blood fats.

You can keep your blood sugar levels in a safe range by making healthy food choices and monitoring your eating habits. For many people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss can help to control blood sugar and provides a host of other health benefits. If you will need to shed weight, a diabetes diet gives a well-organized, nutritious way to attain your goal safely. Make your calories count with these healthful foods. Choose healthy carbohydrates, fiber-rich fish, foods, and "good" fats. As carbs break down into glucose, they have the best influence on your blood sugar level. To help control your blood glucose, you might need to learn how to calculate the number of carbs you are eating so you may adjust the dose of insulin accordingly. If you are taking insulin, a dietitian can teach you how to count the amount of carbohydrates in each meal.


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136 Case Studies
100 Member Stories
1514 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

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Online & in-office

Getting a case of acid reflux (heartburn) once in a while isn't unusual, but some people suffer from burning discomfort, bloating, and belching virtually every time they consume. About 20 percent of the populace has gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic acid reflux condition that is diagnosed by a health care provider.

Good treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Always starts with a visit to a healthcare professional to get an accurate diagnosis. It's important to realize that chronic reflux doesn't get better by itself. Treatment for GERD may include medications advised by your physician and a particular lifestyle and diet changes. A mixture of approaches, and some trial and error, may be necessary. Diet and lifestyle changes often begin with what to avoid. These include things that may trigger or aggravate symptoms.

Coming up with the proper diet and lifestyle changes involve finding what works best for you. Not all triggers and treatments will affect all people in precisely the identical way. Remember that if you consume could be just as important as what you eat.  Eating right For GERD doesn't have to mean cutting out all your favorite foods. Making only a couple of simple modifications to your current diet is often enough.

While no known "GERD diet" exists, some foods may help you alleviate or prevent symptoms like fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, complex carbohydrates, healthier fats, and lean meat.  Avoid eating immediately before bed. Digestion raises the amount of gastric acid within the stomach. When you lie down, the capacity of the LES to prevent stomach contents from travel up the esophagus reduces. Occurring together, plenty of stomach acid and a reclined position are a recipe for reflux. Timing can differ from individual to individual, but normally, eating a complete meal less than four or three hours before bed isn't a good idea for GERD sufferers.

Eating right for GERD Doesn't have to mean cutting out all your favorite foods. Making just a couple of simple modifications to your current diet is often enough to help reduce the discomforts of GERD. The goal is to produce a diet plan based on a healthy selection of foods that have fruits and veggies, lean sources of protein, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats.

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127 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1523 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Gestational Diabetes

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The first step in healing gestational diabetes would include altering your diet to help keep your blood glucose level at the normal level while eating a wholesome diet. Most women with well-controlled blood glucose levels deliver healthy babies with no complications. One way of keeping your glucose levels in the normal range is by controlling the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and become blood sugar (a kind of sugar). Glucose in the blood is essential because it's the fuel for your body and nutrition your baby receives from you. However, it is important that glucose levels remain within the target.

- Carbohydrates in Food: Carbohydrates are found in the following foods:

- Rice, grains, cereals, and pasta

- Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash

- Milk and yogurt

- Fruits and juices

- Bread, tortillas, crackers, bagels, and rolls

- Dried beans, split peas, and lentils

- Sweets and desserts also have considerable amounts of carbohydrates.

Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called g. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels. The main pieces of information on food labels to get a carbohydrate-controlled diet is that the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in every serving.

Dietary Recommendations: It's essential to be meet with a registered dietitian (RD) to have your diet evaluated. The dietitian will calculate the quantity of carbohydrates that you need at meals and snacks. You'll also be taught how to count carbohydrates.

- Distribute your meals involving three meals and two or three snacks daily

- Breakfast matters: Blood sugar can be tricky to control in the daytime due to normal fluctuations in hormone levels.

- Processed cereals, fruits as well as milk might not be well tolerated in your morning meal. If your post-breakfast blood glucose level increases a lot following these foods, then you should not eat them for your own breakfast. A breakfast that contains protein plus starch is usually tolerated the very best.

- Avoid fruit juice: It requires many fruits to produce a glass of juice. The juice is a concentrated source of carbohydrates. As it's liquid, the juice may raise blood sugar quickly.

- Strictly limit desserts and sweets: Cakes, cookies, and pastries have excessive amounts of carbohydrates. These foods often have considerable amounts of fat and give little concerning nutrition. Furthermore, prevent all regular sodas and sugar-sweetened drinks.

- Stay away from added sugars.

- Do not add honey, sugar, or syrup to your meals.

- When a product says it is "sugar-free," have a second look.

- When products containing sugar-alcohols are often labeled "sugar-free," they may still contain substantial quantities of total carbohydrates. Examine the food label to find the grams of total carbohydrate included.

- Sugar alcohols can have a laxative effect or cause bloating and gas.  Some products labeled "sugar-free" are really carbohydrate-free and won't affect your blood glucose, such as diet sodas and sugar-free Jell-o.

- Keep food records: Make sure to record all the foods, and how much you eat every day, that can help you track your carbohydrate intake. Additionally, use measuring cups for precision when possible.

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151 Case Studies
96 Member Stories
1606 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Heart Disease

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Although you may know that certain foods may improve your heart disease risk, it is often challenging to change your eating routine and habits. Even if you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt or you only need to modify your diet, here are eight heart-healthy diet suggestions. As soon as you know which foods to eat more of and which foods to limit, you will be on your way into a healthy diet for your heart.

1. Control portions 

How much you chow down is just as important as what you eat. Overloading the plate, taking multiple servings, and eating until you feel stuffed can lead to eating more calories than you should. Portions served in restaurants tend to be more than anyone needs.

Use a small bowl or plate to help control your portions. Eat larger portions of low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods, like fruits and veggies, and smaller parts of high-calorie such as refined, processed or fast foods. This strategy can shape your diet in addition to your heart and waistline.

Keep track of the portions size you eat. The suggested number of servings per food group may vary depending upon the particular diet program or guidelines you are following. A serving size is a given quantity of food, defined by common measurements such as cups, ounces or pieces. A serving of beef, poultry or fish is about 2-3 ounces, or about the size and thickness of a deck of cards. Judging serving size is a learned ability. You might have to use measuring cups and spoons or a scale until you are comfortable with your own judgment.

2. Eat more veggies and fruits

Vegetables and fruits are good sources of minerals and vitamins. Fruits and vegetables are also low in calories and rich in dietary fiber. Vegetables and fruits, as with other plants or plant-based foods, contain chemicals that can help prevent heart disease. Eating more fruits and veggies may help you cut back on higher-calorie foods, such as meat, cheese, and snack foods. Featuring fruits and vegetables in your daily diet can be easy. Have vegetables washed and cut in your refrigerator for quick snacks. Keep fruit in a bowl on your kitchen so you'll remember to consume it. Choose recipes that have fruits or veggies as the main ingredients, such as vegetable stir-fry or fresh fruit blended into salads.

3. Select whole grains

Whole grains are perfect sources of fiber and other nutrients that play a role in regulating blood pressure and heart health. You may increase the amount of whole grains in a heart-healthy diet by making simple substitutions for processed grain products. Or be adventuresome and try a fresh whole grain, such as whole farro, quinoa, or barley.

4. Limit unhealthy fats

Limiting just how much saturated and trans fats you eat is an important step to lower your blood cholesterol and decrease your risk of coronary artery disease. A high blood glucose level may result in a buildup of plaques in your arteries, known as atherosclerosis, which can raise your risk of heart attack and stroke.

You can also utilize low-fat substitutions when possible for a heart-healthy diet. By way of instance, top your baked potato with low-sodium salsa or low-fat yogurt as opposed to butter, or use the sliced whole fruit or low-sugar fruit spread on your toast rather than margarine. You can also look at the food labels of several biscuits, cakes, frostings, chips, and crackers. Some of them, even those labeled "reduced-fat", could be made with oils containing trans fats. One hint that a food has some trans fat in it's the phrase"partially hydrogenated" in the ingredient listing.

All kinds of fat are high in calories. When you do consume fats, choose monounsaturated fats, such as virgin olive oil or canola oil. Polyunsaturated fats, found in avocados, nuts, and certain fish, are also great options for a heart-healthy diet. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can lower your total blood cholesterol. But moderation is vital. 

A comfortable angle to add healthy fat and fiber in your diet plan is ground flaxseed. Flaxseeds are little brown seeds that are high in fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. A number of studies have found that flaxseeds can help lower cholesterol in some people, but more study is necessary. It is possible to grind the seeds in a coffee grinder or food processor and stir a teaspoon of these into yogurt, applesauce, or hot cereal.

5. Choose low-fat protein resources

Lean meat, fish and poultry, low-fat dairy products, and eggs are a few of the best sources of protein. But take care to choose lower fat choices, such as skim milk instead of whole milk and skinless chicken breasts as opposed to fried chicken patties.

Fish is another good choice for high-fat meats. And certain kinds of fish are full of omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce blood fats known as triglycerides. You'll discover the highest quantities of omega-3 fatty acids in cold-water fish, walnuts, flaxseed, soybeans, and canola oil.

Legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, contain less fat and no cholesterol, and are good sources of protein and making them suitable substitutes for meat. Substituting plant protein for animal protein -- for instance, a bean or soy burger for a hamburger -- will lower your cholesterol and fat intake and increase your fiber intake.

6. Reduce the sodium in your food

Eating more sodium can result in elevated blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Reducing sodium intake is an essential part of a heart-healthy diet. 

Although Lowering the amount of salt you add to food at the table or while cooking is a fantastic first step, a lot of the salt you eat comes from processed or canned foods.

If you like the ease of canned soups and ready meals, search for ones with reduced sodium. Be careful of foods that claim to be reduced in sodium since they're seasoned with sea salt instead of regular table salt, as sea salt has the same nutritional value as regular salt.

Another way to decrease the amount of salt you consume is to pick your condiments carefully. Many spices can be found in reduced-sodium versions, and salt substitutes may add flavor to your food with less sodium.

7. Have an occasional cheat day

Allow yourself a candy bar or a handful of potato chips will not hamper your heart-healthy diet. But do not let it become an excuse for giving up on your own healthy-eating plan. If overindulgence is the exception, as opposed to the rule, you are going to balance things out over the long run. What is important is that you eat healthy foods most of the time.

Incorporate these tips into your daily life, and you might discover that heart-healthy eating is both doable and fun. With planning and a couple of simple substitutions, you can eat with your heart in your mind.


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142 Case Studies
96 Member Stories
1513 Research
128 Case Studies
93 Member Stories
1518 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Immunity

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There's evidence that nutrition and other lifestyle measures affect immune power and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Whether these steps do or don't affect susceptibility to coronavirus or its clinical course isn't yet clear. However, there's every reason to place what we do know about meals and immune defenses to utilize. But there is plenty we do know about diet and immunity.

Diet: Eating a low-carb, plant-based diet might help give the immune system a boost. The immune system is based on white blood cells that produce antibodies to fight bacteria, viruses, and other germs. Vegetarians have been shown to have more effective white blood cells when compared to nonvegetarians because of the high intake of vitamins and reduced consumption of fat.

Eating a low-fat diet might also be protective. Studies have shown that restricting dietary fat helps strengthen immune defenses. Research also indicates that oil can impair white blood cell function and that high-fat diets can alter the gut microbiota that assists in immunity. Maintaining a healthy weight can benefit the immune system. Obesity and excess weight has been connected to a higher risk for flu and other infections. Plant-based diets are effective for weight loss since they're full of fiber, which will help fill you up without adding extra calories. Fiber may also lower BMI, which can be linked to enhanced immunity. A vegetarian diet has also been shown to reduce inflammatory biomarkers.

Minerals, Vitamins, and Antioxidants: Studies have shown that fruits and veggies provide nutrients--such as beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E--which can boost immune function. Since many vegetables, fruits, and other foods that are fermented are also rich in antioxidants, they help reduce oxidative stress.

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151 Case Studies
104 Member Stories
1539 Research
127 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1513 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

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In-office & online

Laryngopharyngeal reflux is a sort of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). LPR is the backward motion of stomach enzymes (Pepsin) and acid in the lower throat region. Contents of the stomach can flow all the way up the esophagus, in the back of the throat, and, sometimes, in the back of the nasal passages.  LPR patients may not even be aware of  LPR. Unlike Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) patients, they don't feel the heartburn sensation. When the throat lining is irritated by gut contents, there's the secretion of a mucus blanket in an effort to protect the liner from the caustic agents. Frequent coughing and throat clearing are typical symptoms. Individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux might feel as though they have something stuck in their throat. Laryngopharyngeal reflux can lead to hoarseness and other voice issues, too.

Patients can manifest symptoms like excessive throat-clearing (particularly in the morning or after a meal), persistent dry cough, sore throats not associated with a cold, hoarseness, or the feeling of a lump in the throat. The natural treatment of LPR requires multiple approaches with a focus on diet and behavior changes. The significant contributor to laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is malfunctioning sphincters. Sphincters act as valves that keep food in the ideal organ of your digestive tract until it is ready to be passed.

The LES is the first anti-reflux barrier that sits right above the stomach. The LES must open at precisely the right moment to digest food, but prevent any reflux the remainder of the time. For reasons not yet fully understood, the LES relaxes regularly. Those events are known as transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations.

The lower esophageal sphincter is a muscle that gets weaker over time. It stops working as it should as a barrier against reflux. After years of overeating and poor eating habits, the reduced Esophageal sphincter can get weaker, and reflux can grow. Most individuals do not even understand that they're eating unnaturally -- as pretty much everyone nowadays is doing it. We develop it. There are supplementary measures one can take to help control laryngopharyngeal reflux. Among the most significant is eating a diet that's low in acid. Research has indicated that this kind of diet often can reduce laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

...more
166 Case Studies
109 Member Stories
1548 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Migraine

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In-office and online

Eating a healthy diet can help prevent migraines. A healthful diet should include fresh foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. Fresh foods are less likely to have additional food additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG). Preservatives can cause migraines in some people, so eliminating these foods from your diet can help.

The Association of Migraine Disorders has compiled a list of migraine safe foods to direct an individual's food choices. These foods usually do not contain additives, yeasts, flavorings, and other substances, which are possible migraine triggers, like nitrites and phenylalanine.

Eating several smaller meals during the day may also help maintain steady blood glucose levels and protect against hunger, which can cause migraines in some people. A healthy approach to the diet can help a person maintain a healthy weight also. According to the AMF (American Migraine Foundation), being overweight can worsen symptoms or increase their frequency.

Not eating anything can also lead to an increased incidence frequency of migraines. For some individuals, prolonged hunger and not eating enough are well-known headache triggers. This may be due to a correlation between low glucose levels and worsening migraine headaches.

Some physicians may recommend that people with migraines maintain a food journal to track what they eat and some other headache symptoms they experience.

It's worth noting that some folks might have an immediate response to a food, while some might not respond until a day after eating.

Remove possible food triggers from the diet for a week to find out if migraines still occur during that time period. A person may decide to avoid only those products that contain black beans for a week. This approach can guarantee that people don't eliminate otherwise healthy foods from their diet.


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131 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1514 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Pancreatitis

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With inflamed pancreas, your body can not produce enough of the digestive enzymes which help absorb nutrients from your diet. Over time, one can become malnourished and even start losing weight. A different diet may make it much easier for your pancreas to perform its job.

Changes in diet do not affect all patients in the exact same way. The effect depends on if you have an acute or chronic case of pancreatitis. Patients with mild pancreatitis may benefit from diet and lifestyle changes alone. However, diet isn't necessarily enough by itself to control symptoms in moderate to severe cases.

Recovering through your diet: If you have suffered an acute pancreatitis episode, you can help speed your recovery with a few lifestyle and dietary changes. Try these tips:

• Don't smoke or drink alcohol.

• Eat 6 to 8 smaller meals a day. It is easier on your pancreas.

• Add 1 to 2 tbsp of MCTs to your everyday diet, and you are able to continue this if you've severe chronic pancreatitis.

• Limit your total fat intake to less than 30 g every day. Eliminate saturated fats.

• Take multivitamin supplements to replenish vitamins A, D, E, K, B12, folic acid, and zinc.

• Drink fluids to stay hydrated.

If your abdominal pain continues, your physician can also refer you to a pain management expert. Ultimately, controlling your diet is often an effective way to safeguard your pancreas. Whether the inflammation is acute or chronic, minimize the excess workload for the pancreas. Concentrate on eating a low-carb diet that will not tax or inflame your pancreas.

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127 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1513 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Pistachio Nut

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In-office & online

Laryngopharyngeal reflux is a sort of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). LPR is the backward motion of stomach enzymes (Pepsin) and acid in the lower throat region. Contents of the stomach can flow all the way up the esophagus, in the back of the throat, and, sometimes, in the back of the nasal passages.  LPR patients may not even be aware of  LPR. Unlike Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) patients, they don't feel the heartburn sensation. When the throat lining is irritated by gut contents, there's the secretion of a mucus blanket in an effort to protect the liner from the caustic agents. Frequent coughing and throat clearing are typical symptoms. Individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux might feel as though they have something stuck in their throat. Laryngopharyngeal reflux can lead to hoarseness and other voice issues, too.

Patients can manifest symptoms like excessive throat-clearing (particularly in the morning or after a meal), persistent dry cough, sore throats not associated with a cold, hoarseness, or the feeling of a lump in the throat. The natural treatment of LPR requires multiple approaches with a focus on diet and behavior changes. The significant contributor to laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is malfunctioning sphincters. Sphincters act as valves that keep food in the ideal organ of your digestive tract until it is ready to be passed.

The LES is the first anti-reflux barrier that sits right above the stomach. The LES must open at precisely the right moment to digest food, but prevent any reflux the remainder of the time. For reasons not yet fully understood, the LES relaxes regularly. Those events are known as transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations.

The lower esophageal sphincter is a muscle that gets weaker over time. It stops working as it should as a barrier against reflux. After years of overeating and poor eating habits, the reduced Esophageal sphincter can get weaker, and reflux can grow. Most individuals do not even understand that they're eating unnaturally -- as pretty much everyone nowadays is doing it. We develop it. There are supplementary measures one can take to help control laryngopharyngeal reflux. Among the most significant is eating a diet that's low in acid. Research has indicated that this kind of diet often can reduce laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

...more
143 Case Studies
97 Member Stories
1514 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Polycystic Ovary Syndrome PCOS

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Online & in-office

Two of the primary ways that diet influences PCOS are weight control and insulin resistance and production. However, insulin plays a major role in PCOS. Managing insulin levels using a PCOS diet is one of the greatest steps people can take to deal with the condition. Lots of people with PCOS have insulin resistance. More than half of those with PCOS develop diabetes or pre-diabetes before age 40. Diabetes is directly linked to how the body processes insulin. Following a diet that matches a person's nutritional needs, maintains a healthy weight, and promotes good insulin levels helps people with PCOS feel much better. Studies have found that what people eat has a substantial effect on PCOS. There's presently no regular diet for PCOS, however. Some foods are beneficial and appear to help people manage their illnesses, and some foods are best to avoid.

 Some diets which may assist people with PCOS to manage their symptoms include an anti-inflammatory diet,  a low GI (glycemic index) diet, and the DASH diet. The body digests foods with a low GI more slowly, meaning they don't cause insulin levels to rise as much or as fast as other foods. These diets have foods with a low GI diet include legumes, seeds, whole grains, and other unprocessed, low-carbohydrate foods.


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130 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1522 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Prediabetes

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A terrific thing about prediabetes is that it's often reversible. Typically, you don't even need medications. All you will need are the ideal diet program, added healthy lifestyle options like exercising and quitting smoking, and plenty of patience and commitment. There's no single best diet strategy for prediabetes. Your diet program should help you control your weight, provide the nourishment and healthful foods you will need to reduce the risk for diabetes and other chronic ailments and fit into your lifestyle so you can make it work for the long run.

Apart from weight, certain nutrients are linked to improved health and reduced diabetes risk. By way of instance, increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and legumes, eating more whole grains rather than processed, and picking olive oil can all decrease diabetes risk. Limiting sweets, eating low carbohydrate foods and processed carbohydrates such as white bread and pasta, and unhealthy fats from fried foods and fatty meats are examples of dietary patterns to impede any development of prediabetes.

If you don't adhere to the diet program, it won't work. Any diet, however nutritionally perfect, should fit into your lifestyle. Your prediabetic diet needs to:

Include the foods you like to eat. Permit for indulgences and special events, so that you may meet the occasional craving and match in a party or work event without going off your diet plan or feeling guilty.

Rely on "regular" ingredients and foods your neighborhood supermarket carries. Ask that you spend only the amount of time in the kitchen you want, as opposed to needing gourmet recipes for all three meals. A prediabetes diet program can help your blood sugars get closer to or even in healthy ranges. In prediabetes, your blood glucose is greater than normal but still lower than in diabetes (this is called insulin resistance). A healthy diet for prediabetes doesn't necessarily have to be low in carbs. Based on U.S. News and World Report rankings, both forms of diet for prediabetes and higher cholesterol in 2020 are moderate diet routines. A Mediterranean diet pattern is ranked first, followed closely by the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, diet.

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129 Case Studies
92 Member Stories
1513 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

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Women may think there is not much they can do to maintain premenstrual syndrome (PMS) under control. It turns out that there are natural methods to control symptoms, such as exercise and a proper diet. Exercising and healthy eating can help to control the bloating, irritability, depression, and mood changes associated with PMS. Consider these dietary changes:

Reduce salt. Cook and eat your own food. Fast food or processed foods is best avoided because it contains salt used in many forms. Eating less salt is very suggested for women with bloating, breast tenderness, or swollen hands.

Eat an assortment of fruits and veggies; concentrate on leafy greens. You need to "eat out of the rainbow" of different kinds and colors for more nutrients. Vegetables such as kale, turnip greens, or Swiss chard are full of iron and B vitamins, which may ward off fatigue. Consider sautéing the greens in olive oil and drizzle in some fresh minced garlic, chopped onion, and balsamic vinegar splash.

Drink eight glasses of water daily to decrease bloating, aids in digestion, and has several other health benefits. It is also possible to flavor your water with lemons, limes, or cucumber slices.

Eat more calcium/low--fat dairy. Some studies indicate that eating more calcium -- in foods such as yogurt, milk, soy products, and low-fat cheese -- can reduce an assortment of PMS symptoms.

Get your vitamin D. Besides nutritional supplements, vitamin D is found naturally in foods such as sardines, salmon, and sardines. Increasing your vitamin D can help reduce PMS symptoms.

Snack on nuts. Nuts contain omega-3 fatty acids and help you feel full longer. Try several nuts such as almonds and hazelnuts.

Restrict alcohol. While it's tempting to have a drink that will help you unwind, alcohol can disrupt your sleep. A glass of wine at night might help you go to sleep but may wake you up when the alcohol wears off.

Restrict caffeine. Excess caffeine can also disrupt sleep and contribute to PMS symptoms.

Eat iron-rich foods like lean meats. You will need to increase iron intake before and during your period to replace what you get rid of monthly. A diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you avoid anemia. 

Eat complex carbs. Foods that have complex carbohydrates consist of three or more natural sugars and are full of fiber. These foods slowly enter the bloodstream, causing only a moderate increase in insulin levels that help stabilize your mood. Try sweet potatoes, potatoes, squash, pumpkin, lentils,  and unprocessed oats.

Eat whole grains. Swap any processed grains such as whole grain bread, pasta, cereals, and brown rice. Changing progesterone and estrogen levels can reduce amounts of serotonin from the mind, which may adversely affect your mood.

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149 Case Studies
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138 Case Studies
96 Member Stories
1527 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Ulcerative Colitis

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IBD is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body is attacking its cells. Research indicates that people with IBD have a specific gene in their DNA, which makes them vulnerable to developing the illness. But this gene requires a trigger so as to be turned on. That trigger may be a viral infection like the flu or a cold, it could be the antibiotics given during surgery, or it may even be a stressful life event. When the gene is turned on, it probably can't be turned off, so the therapy's objective is disease remission.

To reduce the redness in the gut, cure the ulcers, and prevent daily diarrhea and cramping, begin gluten- and - dairy-free diet for at least six months. Researchers found In a 2014 study, that about 65 percent of study participants with IBD who'd attempted a gluten-free diet experienced fewer GI symptoms.  An individual with ulcerative colitis may find they will need to alter their diet to help manage their symptoms. There's no single diet or meal plan that fits everybody with ulcerative colitis, and diets are individualized for each patient. Based on symptoms, distinct types of diets may be recommended, for example:

A low-carb diet

A low-fiber diet (low-residue diet)

A high-calorie diet: 

Many with ulcerative colitis lose weight and may develop signs of malnutrition. A high-calorie diet can prevent these issues.

A lactose-free diet

A low-salt diet

A low FODMAP diet

A gluten-free diet

Attention to nourishment is essential for patients with ulcerative colitis, as the indications of nausea and bleeding may result in dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and lack of nourishment. It might be necessary to choose nutritional supplements if your symptoms don't let you consume a nutritionally balanced diet. Speak with your health-care professional about what supplements to take. Many people with ulcerative colitis find it easiest to eat smaller, more frequent meals than a few large ones. This may also help boost the nourishment absorbed from the foods you eat.

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1515 Research

Diet Therapy Treatments For Women's Health And Pregnancy

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Dieting During Your Pregnancy: What does diet during pregnancy mean? When we refer to diet while pregnant, we're not talking about restricting calories or attempting to drop weight. Dieting to lose weight during pregnancy can be hazardous to you and your baby, especially since a weight loss regimen can confine important nutrients like iron, folic acid, and other essential minerals and vitamins. The American Pregnancy Association recommends avoiding popular diets like Atkins, South Beach, The Zone, Raw Food Diet, etc. The sort of diet we promote during pregnancy describes fine-tuning your eating habits to ensure you're receiving adequate nutrition for the health of you and your baby. Healthy eating during pregnancy is essential to your child's growth and development. So as to get the nutrients you need, you must eat from many different food groups, including fruits and vegetables, bread and grains, protein sources, and dairy products. Typically, you'll have to consume an additional 300 calories each day. It's always important to eat a variety of foods during the day ensuring you get the nutrients both you and your baby need. Here's a look at the food groups and a few suggested sources for making a healthy diet during pregnancy.

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