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Ulcerative Colitis research studies for holistic treatments

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized
treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered
from their problems after ulcerative-colitis treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit
of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of ulcerative-colitis and related therapies
as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

/ title=”Effects of Ayurvedic treatment on forty-three patients of ulcerative colitis”>
Effects of Ayurvedic treatment on forty-three patients of ulcerative colitis

August 2020

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Introduction

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Its incidence is more from 20 to 40 years of age and 5–10 per 100,000 persons are at risk.[/ rid=”ref1″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>1] Bleeding in the stool with increased bowel frequency is the cardinal feature of this disease. Weakness is more common due to the loss of water and blood in the stool. In conventional Western medicine, some drugs like sulfasalazine may give mild relief in symptoms and signs but after some time patients need more doses of the same drug. Some patients get to benefit from steroids, which again are not suitable because of their side-effects. Even after taking steroids and sulfasalazine drugs patients suffer from the disease. So the patients are always seeking some alternative therapy promising more effective and safer outcomes.

The authors found some encouraging results in the patients of ulcerative colitis with certain Ayurvedic treatments. The treatment significantly corrected bleeding in stool and bowel frequency which are the cardinal features of ulcerative colitis, In addition, the treatments also improved the general condition of the patient. Ulcerative colitis is a disease of Purishavaha srotas. In AyurvedaRaktatisara is mentioned as an advanced stage of Pittatisara. Piccha basti also mentioned as the management of Raktatisara in Charaka Samhita.[/ rid=”ref2″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>2] This disease can be co-related with ulcerative colitis.

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Aims and Objectives

The aims and objectives of this study were as follows –

  1. To prove the efficacy of Ayurvedic treatment in the management of ulcerative colitis.

  2. To provide a large population suffering from ulcerative colitis, a future possibility of safer treatment; this can be helpful in reducing the need of steroids and surgical processes.

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Materials and Methods

Selection of patients

Forty-three cases with a classical picture of ulcerative colitis were randomly selected irrespective of age, sex, and chronicity from the OPD and IPD of the P. D. Patel Ayurveda Hospital, attached to J. S. Ayurveda College, Nadiad, Gujarat.

Criteria for inclusion

  • Signs and symptoms of ulcerative colitis

  • Colonoscopic diagnosis of ulcerative colitis

Criteria for exclusion

  • Patients who had undergone surgeries

  • Patients who had complications like anal fistula

  • Patients with any other associated disease

Plan of study and treatments

  • Proforma compiled with detailed clinical history and physical exam of the patients.

  • Investigations like Hb g%, Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Stool routine – microscopy and colonoscopy

  • After confirming the diagnosis 43 patients were given the following treatment –

    • Udumbara kvatha (ingredient is Udumbar tvak-Ficus glomerata) – 40 ml/two times a day

    • Lodhra tvak churna (Symplocos racemosa) – 1 g + Musta moola churna (cyperus rotundus) – 1 g + Nagakesara (Mesua ferrea) churna – 1 g + Mukta panchamrut rasa-125 mg / three times in a day with water (the ingredients of Mukta panchamrut rasa are Mukta bhasma – 8 parts + Praval bhasma – 4 parts + Banga bhasma – 2 parts + Shankha bhasma – 1 part + Shukti bhasma – 1 part, processed in Ikshurasa, Godugdha, Vidai svarasa, Kumari svarasa, Shatavari Svarasa, Tulasi svarasa and Hansapadi svarasa).

    • Kutaja Ghana vati (ingredient is Kutaja tvak-Holarrhena antidysenterica) – 1g / three times a day.

    • Udumbara kvatha basti (ingredient is Udumbar tvak-Ficus glomerata) daily for one week and then twice a week for the next three weeks.

This treatment was given for a study period of one month.

Preparation of medicines

Medicines were prepared under expert supervision and purchased from Sunder Ayurveda Pharmacy, Nadiad.

Diet

Patients were kept on pitta –shamaka, laghu, grahi and pathya food articles.

If the patient was taking any modern medicine, doses of these were gradually reduced as the patient responded to Ayurvedic treatments.

Criteria for assessment

The improvement in the patients was assessed on the basis of relief in the symptoms and signs of the disease together with laboratory investigations. All the symptoms and signs were given grade scores and assessed before as well as after treatment. Changes in hemoglobin, ESR, and body weight were also recorded before and after treatment. Reductions in the doses of steroid and sulfasalazine drugs were also recorded.

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Observations, Results and Discussion

Most of the patients (93.02%) belonged to the 20 – 40 years age group [/ rid-figpopup=”T1″ rid-ob=”ob-T1″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 1]. In this study 65.12% of them were males and 34.88% were females [/ rid-figpopup=”T2″ rid-ob=”ob-T2″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 2]. In other studies of modern medicines, the incidence of this disease in males and females is equal. Of the patients, 83.72% were Hindu [/ rid-figpopup=”T3″ rid-ob=”ob-T3″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 3]; 46.51% had less than 1 year chronicity; 20.93% patients belonged to the 1 to 3 years chronicity group; 20.93% were found in the more than 3 to 5 years chronicity group. Only 11.63% patients were found in the more than 5 years’ chronicity group [/ rid-figpopup=”T4″ rid-ob=”ob-T4″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 4].

Table 1

Distribution of the patients according to age

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Table 2

Distribution of the patients according to sex

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Table 3

Distribution of the patients according to religion

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Table 4

Distribution of the patients according to chronicity

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Bowel frequency was reduced by 81.81% and this benefit was statistically highly significant, Bleeding in stool was reduced by 91.58% and this was also statistically highly significant, Abdominal pain was reduced by 86.76% and this too was statistically highly significant, Weakness was reduced by 65.97%, again a statistically highly significant result, Body weight was increased by 2.31% and it was also statistically highly significant [/ rid-figpopup=”T5″ rid-ob=”ob-T5″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 5]. Hemoglobin level was increased by 16.76%, which was statistically a highly significant result, ESR was decreased by 44.16% and it was also statistically highly significant, RBC in stool was decreased by 93.02% and it too was statistically highly significant, Pus cells in stool were decreased by 80.76% and it also was statistically highly significant [/ rid-figpopup=”T6″ rid-ob=”ob-T6″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 6]. Forty-three patients had positive occult blood test before starting this treatment. Only four patients were found with positive occult blood test after the trial therapy. So 90.70% patients showed negative occult blood test after this treatment.[/ rid-figpopup=”T7″ rid-ob=”ob-T7″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 7]. The drug prednisolone was taken by 16 patients in this study and the dose was reduced by 87.32%, that suggests a highly significant result, The dose of the sulfasalazine drug was reduced by 77.00% and it was also statistically highly significant [/ rid-figpopup=”T8″ rid-ob=”ob-T8″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 8]. None of the patients developed any new complication or new undesirable features [/ rid-figpopup=”T9″ rid-ob=”ob-T9″ style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143); display: inline-block !important; zoom: 1 !important;” target=”table”>Table 9]. All the signs and symptoms, laboratory investigations and dose of steroids and sulfasalazine drugs were reduced, which was statistically highly significant.

Table 5

Effects of Ayurved therapy on signs and symptoms of ulcerative colitis

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Table 6

Effects of Ayurvedic therapy on investigations of patients of ulcerative colitis

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Table 7

Effects of Ayurvedic therapy on occult blood test

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Table 8

Effects on reduction of the dose of steroids and sulfasalazine drugs

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Table 9

Improvement in symptoms and signs and investigations

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Probable mode of action of the therapy

Ulcerative colitis is a disease of purisha vaha srotas which is caused by Pitta pradhana Vata doshas. Udumbara kvatha has properties of Pitta Vata shamana and also vrana shodana and ropana[/ rid=”ref3″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>3] which help in healing ulcers in the colon by basti karma. It also has stambhana properties that help in reducing the bowel frequency and check bleeding. Kutaja ghan vati[/ rid=”ref4″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>4] contains ghana satva of Kutaja tvak and has an Atisara nashaka (stambhana) guna that also helps in reducing the bowel frequency. Musta[/ rid=”ref5″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>5] with its grahiaction relieves the ama in the body and also reduces the bowel frequency. Nagakeshara has Raktatisara nashaka[/ rid=”ref6″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>6] and Lodhra[/ rid=”ref7″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>7] has rakta stambhaka action that checks the bleeding. Mukta panchamrut rasa[/ rid=”ref8″ role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);”>8] is a classical compound Ayurveda drug that relieves excessive Pitta dosha and ushna guna in body. One of the ingredients of Mukta also relieves mental stress which is a contributing factor to the disease.

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Conclusion

On the basis of our clinical observation and discussion, it may be concluded that ulcerative colitis was found in middle-aged people between 20 to 40 years of age. The results obtained may be attributed to the disease-modifying effect of the trial therapy by means of its anti-pitta, vranashodhana-ropana, grahi and stambhana properties. All the signs and symptoms were reduced by more than 80% and the reduction was statistically highly significant. RBCs in stool which is the main clinical sign of this disease was reduced by 93.02%. Hemoglobin increased by 16.76%. The dose of steroids was reduced by 87.32%. All the results were statistically highly significant. The trial therapy is an ideal drug as a safe and effective alternative in case of ulcerative colitis.

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Acknowledgments

The authors are thankful to the management and the Principal of J.S Ayurveda College and P.D.Patel Ayurveda Hospital, Nadiad for providing the permission and facilities for this study.

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References

1. Davidson S. 16th ed. Churchill: Livingstone Elsevier publication; 1995. Davidson’s Principles and Practice of Medicine; p. 485. [/ ref=”reftype=other&article-id=3202252&issue-id=201587&journal-id=1645&FROM=Article%7CCitationRef&TO=Content%20Provider%7CLink%7CGoogle%20Scholar” role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);” target=”pmc_ext”>Google Scholar]
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6. Dvivedi Vishvanath. 9th ed. Varanasi: Motilal Banarasidas Prakashan; 1998. Hindi commentator, Bhava prakash nighantu; p. 121. [/ ref=”reftype=other&article-id=3202252&issue-id=201587&journal-id=1645&FROM=Article%7CCitationRef&TO=Content%20Provider%7CLink%7CGoogle%20Scholar” role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);” target=”pmc_ext”>Google Scholar]
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8. Department of health and family welfare. Government of India. civil line Delhi: The controller of publication; 2003. The Ayurvedic pharmacopeia of India-– part – A, Rasayoga Vibhaga-20/29; p. 699. [/ ref=”reftype=other&article-id=3202252&issue-id=201587&journal-id=1645&FROM=Article%7CCitationRef&TO=Content%20Provider%7CLink%7CGoogle%20Scholar” role=”button” style=”color: rgb(100, 42, 143);” target=”pmc_ext”>Google Scholar]

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/ title=”Wheat grass juice in the treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.”>
Wheat grass juice in the treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

April 2002

Background:
The use of wheat grass (Triticum aestivum) juice for treatment of various gastrointestinal and other conditions had been suggested by its proponents for more than 30 years, but was never clinically assessed in a controlled trial. A preliminary unpublished pilot study suggested efficacy of wheat grass juice in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC).
METHODS:
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. One gastroenterology unit in a tertiary hospital and three study coordinating centers in three major cities in Israel. Twenty-three patients diagnosed clinically and sigmoidoscopically with active distal UC were randomly allocated to receive either 100 cc of wheat grass juice, or a matching placebo, daily for 1 month. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by a 4-fold activity index that included rectal bleeding and number of bowel movements as determined from patient diary records, a sigmoidoscopic evaluation, and global assessment by a physician.
Results:
Twenty-one patients completed the study, and full information was available on 19 of them. Treatment with wheat grass juice was associated with significant reductions in the overall activity index (P=0.031) and in the severity of rectal bleeding (P = 0.025). No serious side effects were found. Fresh extract of wheat grass demonstrated a prominent tracing in cyclic voltammetry methodology, presumably corresponding to four groups of compounds that exhibit anti-oxidative properties.
Conclusion:
Wheat grass juice appeared effective and safe as a single or adjuvant treatment of active distal UC.

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/ title=”Curcumin in Combination With Mesalamine Induces Remission in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.”>
Curcumin in Combination With Mesalamine Induces Remission in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

July 2015

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The phytochemical compound curcumin was reported to be effective in maintaining remission in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). We investigated curcumin’s efficacy in inducing remission in patients with active mild-to-moderate UC.
METHODS:
We performed a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of 50 mesalamine-treated patients with active mild-to-moderate UC (defined by the Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index [SCCAI]) who did not respond to an additional 2 weeks of the maximum dose of mesalamine oral and topical therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to groups who were given curcumin capsules (3 g/day, n = 26) or an identical placebo (n = 24) for 1 month, with continued mesalamine. The primary outcome was the rate of clinical remission (SCCAI ?2) at week 4. Clinical and endoscopic responses were also recorded.
Results:
In the intention-to-treat analysis, 14 patients (53.8%) receiving curcumin achieved clinical remission at week 4, compared with none of the patients receiving placebo (P = .01; odds ratio [OR], 42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-760). Clinical response (reduction of ?3 points in SCCAI) was achieved by 17 patients (65.3%) in the curcumin group vs 3 patients (12.5%) in the placebo group (P

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/ title=”Curcumin for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis.”>
Curcumin for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis.

December 2011

Background:
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon characterized by episodes of activity and symptom-free remission.There is paucity of evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of complementary or alternative medicines for the management of UC. Curcumin, an anti-inflammatory agent, has been used in many chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, esophagitis and post-surgical inflammation. The efficacy of this agent for maintenance of remission in patients with UC has not been systematically evaluated. OBJECTIVES:
The primary objective was to systematically review the efficacy and safety of curcumin for maintenance of remission in UC. SEARCH
METHODS:
A computer-assisted literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Specialized Trial Register was performed on July 11, 2012 to identify relevant publications. Proceedings from major gastroenterology meetings and references from published articles were also searched to identify additional studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCT) of curcumin for maintenance of remission in UC were included. Studies included patients (of any age) who were in remission at the time of recruitment. Co-interventions were allowed. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were analyzed using Review Manager (RevMan 5.1). We calculated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for each dichotomous outcome. For continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% CI. MAIN
Results:
Only one trial (89 patients) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This trial randomized 45 patients to curcumin and 44 patients to placebo. All patients received treatment with sulfasalazine or mesalamine. The study was rated as low risk of bias. Curcumin was administered orally in a dose of 2 g/day for six months. Fewer patients relapsed in the curcumin group than the placebo group at six months. Four per cent of patients in the curcumin group relapsed at six months compared to 18% of patients in the placebo group (RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.09; P = 0.06). There was no statistically significant difference in relapse rates at 12 months. Twenty-two per cent of curcumin patients relapsed at 12 months compared to 32% of placebo patients (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.40; P = 0.31). A total of nine adverse events were reported in seven patients. These adverse events included sensation of abdominal bulging, nausea, transient hypertension, and transient increase in the number of stools. The authors did not report which treatment group the patients who experienced adverse events belonged to. The clinical activity index (CAI) at six months was significantly lower in the curcumin group compared to the placebo group (1.0 + 2.0 versus 2.2 + 2.3; MD -1.20, 95% CI -2.14 to -0.26). The endoscopic index (EI) at six months was significantly lower in the curcumin group than in the placebo group (0.8 + 0.6 versus 1.6 + 1.6; MD -0.80, 95% CI -1.33 to -0.27). AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS: Curcumin may be a safe and effective therapy for maintenance of remission in quiescent UC when given as adjunctive therapy along with mesalamine or sulfasalazine. However, further research in the form of a large scale methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm any possible benefit of curcumin in quiescent UC.

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/ title=”Curcumin maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis: randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.”>
Curcumin maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis: randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

December 2006

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Curcumin is a biologically active phytochemical substance present in turmeric and has pharmacologic actions that might benefit patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim in this trial was to assess the efficacy of curcumin as maintenance therapy in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis (UC).
METHODS:
Eighty-nine patients with quiescent UC were recruited for this randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial of curcumin in the prevention of relapse. Forty-five patients received curcumin, 1g after breakfast and 1g after the evening meal, plus sulfasalazine (SZ) or mesalamine, and 44 patients received placebo plus SZ or mesalamine for 6 months. Clinical activity index (CAI) and endoscopic index (EI) were determined at entry, every 2 months (CAI), at the conclusion of 6-month trial, and at the end of 6-month follow-up.
Results:
Seven patients were protocol violators. Of 43 patients who received curcumin, 2 relapsed during 6 months of therapy (4.65%), whereas 8 of 39 patients (20.51%) in the placebo group relapsed (P=.040). Recurrence rates evaluated on the basis of intention to treat showed significant difference between curcumin and placebo (P=.049). Furthermore, curcumin improved both CAI (P=.038) and EI (P=.0001), thus suppressing the morbidity associated with UC. A 6-month follow-up was done during which patients in both groups were on SZ or mesalamine. Eight additional patients in the curcumin group and 6 patients in the placebo group relapsed. CONCLUSIONS: Curcumin seems to be a promising and safe medication for maintaining remission in patients with quiescent UC. Further studies on curcumin should strengthen our findings.

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/ title=”1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D improved the free fatty-acid-induced insulin resistance in cultured C2C12 cells.”>
1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D improved the free fatty-acid-induced insulin resistance in cultured C2C12 cells.

April 2009

Background:
Epidemiological evidence has indicated that vitamin D deficiency increased the risk of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D may improve the free fatty-acid (FFA)-induced insulin resistance in muscle cells. METHOD: The insulin resistance of muscle cell model was established by treatment of FFA in differentiated C2C12 cells. Glucose uptake of C2C12 myotubes was analysed by the 3H-labelled 2-deoxyglucose uptake assay. The diameter of myotubes was measured under the condition of glutaraldehyde-induced autofluorescense. Tyrosine phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was measured by immunoprecipitation. Serine phosphorylated IRS-1 and protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), c-Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK) as well as their phosphorylated form were analysed by Western blots.
Results:
Compared with a vehicle-treated group, FFA treatment in myotubes was associated with 70.6% reduction in insulin-mediated uptake of glucose, a five-fold increase in serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, 76.9% decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and 81.8% decrease in phosphorylation of Akt. Supplement of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D improved the FFA-induced inhibition of glucose uptake in a dose- dependent (p

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