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Autism Spectrum Disorders research studies for holistic treatments

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized
treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered
from their problems after autism-spectrum-disorders treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit
of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of autism-spectrum-disorders and related therapies
as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

/ title=”Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).”>
Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

October 2014

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterized by both impaired communication and social interaction, and by stereotypic behavior, affects about 1 in 68, predominantly males. The medico-economic burdens of ASD are enormous, and no recognized treatment targets the core features of ASD. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13-27) with moderate to severe ASD received the phytochemical sulforaphane (n = 29)–derived from broccoli sprout extracts–or indistinguishable placebo (n = 15). The effects on behavior of daily oral doses of sulforaphane (50-150µmol) for 18 wk, followed by 4 wk without treatment, were quantified by three widely accepted behavioral measures completed by parents/caregivers and physicians: the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I). Initial scores for ABC and SRS were closely matched for participants assigned to placebo and sulforaphane. After 18 wk, participants receiving placebo experienced minimal change (<3.3%), whereas those receiving sulforaphane showed substantial declines (improvement of behavior): 34% for ABC (P<0.001, comparing treatments) and 17% for SRS scores (P = 0.017). On CGI-I, a significantly greater number of participants receiving sulforaphane had improvement in social interaction, abnormal behavior, and verbal communication (P = 0.015-0.007). Upon discontinuation of sulforaphane, total scores on all scales rose toward pretreatment levels. Dietary sulforaphane, of recognized low toxicity, was selected for its capacity to reverse abnormalities that have been associated with ASD, including oxidative stress and lower antioxidant capacity, depressed glutathione synthesis, reduced mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation, increased lipid peroxidation, and neuroinflammmation.

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/ title=”Pilot study of the effect of methyl B12 treatment on behavioral and biomarker measures in children with autism.”>
Pilot study of the effect of methyl B12 treatment on behavioral and biomarker measures in children with autism.

May 2010

OBJECTIVES:
The study objectives were to determine whether methyl B12 treatment improves behavioral measures in children with autism and whether improvement is associated with increased plasma concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and an increased redox ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), both of which have been previously identified to be low in children with autism.
DESIGN:
This was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over clinical trial of injectable methyl B12. Following this 12-week study, subjects were given the option of entering a 6-month open-label trial of methyl B12. SETTINGS/LOCATION: All procedures took place at the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute.
SUBJECTS:
Subjects were 3 to 8 years old with autism. INTERVENTIONS: All subjects received 6 weeks of placebo and 6 weeks of methyl B12 at a dose of 64.5 mcg/kg every three days administered subcutaneously into the buttocks. OUTCOME MEASURES: Blood for GSH analysis and behavioral assessments were obtained at baseline, week 6, and week 12.
Results:
Thirty (30) subjects completed the 12-week, double-blind study and 22 subjects completed the 6-month extension study. No statistically significant mean differences in behavior tests or in glutathione status were identified between active and placebo groups. Nine (9) subjects (30%) demonstrated clinically significant improvement on the Clinical Global Impression Scale and at least two additional behavioral measures. More notably, these responders exhibited significantly increased plasma concentrations of GSH and GSH/GSSG. CONCLUSIONS: Comparison of the overall means between groups suggests that methyl B12 is ineffective in treating behavioral symptoms of autism. However, detailed data analysis suggests that methyl B12 may alleviate symptoms of autism in a subgroup of children, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. An increase in glutathione redox status (GSH/GSSG) may provide a biomarker for treatment response to methyl B12. Additional research is needed to delineate a subgroup of potential responders and ascertain a biomarker for response to methyl B12.

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/ title=”Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children.”>
Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children.

January 2016

IMPORTANCE: The association between the use of antidepressants during gestation and the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children is still controversial. The etiology of ASD remains unclear, although studies have implicated genetic predispositions, environmental risk factors, and maternal depression. OBJECTIVE:
To examine the risk of ASD in children associated with antidepressant use during pregnancy according to trimester of exposure and taking into account maternal depression. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a register-based study of an ongoing population-based cohort, the Québec Pregnancy/Children Cohort, which includes data on all pregnancies and children in Québec from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2009. A total of 145,456 singleton full-term infants born alive and whose mothers were covered by the Régie de l’assurance maladie du Québec drug plan for at least12 months before and during pregnancy were included. Data analysis was conducted from October 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. EXPOSURES: Antidepressant exposure during pregnancy was defined according to trimester and specific antidepressant classes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Children with ASD were defined as those with at least 1 diagnosis of ASD between date of birth and last date of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted hazard ratios with 95% CIs.
Results:
During 904,035.50 person-years of follow-up, 1054 children (0.7%) were diagnosed with ASD; boys with ASD outnumbered girls by a ratio of about 4:1. The mean (SD) age of children at the end of follow-up was 6.24 (3.19) years. Adjusting for potential confounders, use of antidepressants during the second and/or third trimester was associated with the risk of ASD (31 exposed infants; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.15-3.04). Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during the second and/or third trimester was significantly associated with an increased risk of ASD (22 exposed infants; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.20-3.93). The risk was persistent even after taking into account maternal history of depression (29 exposed infants; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.03-2.97). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, during the second and/or third trimester increases the risk of ASD in children, even after considering maternal depression. Further research is needed to specifically assess the risk of ASD associated with antidepressant types and dosages during pregnancy.

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/ title=”Bisphenol A Exposure in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.”>
Bisphenol A Exposure in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

May 2015

The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is believed to involve genetic and environmental components. This study focused on the plasticizer, Bisphenol-A (BPA). The major pathway for BPA metabolism and excretion is via glucuronidation. To determine whether there was a relationship between BPA exposure and ASD, urine specimens were collected from 46 children with ASD and 52 controls. Free and total BPA concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry. The fraction glucuronidated was calculated from the difference. A metabolomics study was done to investigate metabolite distribution in the urine. (i) Most of the BPA excreted in the urine was as the glucuronide; (ii) about 20% of the ASD children had BPA levels beyond the 90th percentile (>50 ng/mL) of the frequency distribution for the total sample of 98 children; (iii) Mann-Whitney U tests and multiple regression analyses found significant differences (P?|0.30| between metabolite concentrations and total BPA was?3 times greater with the ASD group than the controls (P??|0.30| for % bound BPA was ?15 times higher with ASD (P?

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/ title=”A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Oral N-Acetylcysteine in Children with Autism.”>
A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Oral N-Acetylcysteine in Children with Autism.

February 2012

Background:
An imbalance in the excitatory/inhibitory systems with abnormalities in the glutamatergic pathways has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autism. Furthermore, chronic redox imbalance was also recently linked to this disorder. The goal of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of using oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutamatergic modulator and an antioxidant, in the treatment of behavioral disturbance in children with autism.
METHODS:
This was a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of NAC in children with autistic disorder. Subjects randomized to NAC were initiated at 900 mg daily for 4 weeks, then 900 mg twice daily for 4 weeks and 900 mg three times daily for 4 weeks. The primary behavioral measure (Aberrant Behavior Checklist [ABC] irritability subscale) and safety measures were performed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Secondary measures included the ABC stereotypy subscale, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised, and Social Responsiveness Scale.
Results:
Thirty-three subjects (31 male subjects, 2 female subjects; aged 3.2-10.7 years) were randomized in the study. Follow-up data was available on 14 subjects in the NAC group and 15 in the placebo group. Oral NAC was well tolerated with limited side effects. Compared with placebo, NAC resulted in significant improvements on ABC irritability subscale (F = 6.80; p

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/ title=”A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of controlled release melatonin treatment of delayed sleep phase syndrome and impaired sleep maintenance in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.”>
A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of controlled release melatonin treatment of delayed sleep phase syndrome and impaired sleep maintenance in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

January 2008

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of controlled-release (CR) melatonin in the treatment of delayed sleep phase syndrome and impaired sleep maintenance of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities including autistic spectrum disorders. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial of CR melatonin (5 mg) followed by a 3-month open-label study was conducted during which the dose was gradually increased until the therapy showed optimal beneficial effects. Sleep characteristics were measured by caregiver who completed somnologs and wrist actigraphs. Clinician rating of severity of the sleep disorder and improvement from baseline, along with caregiver ratings of global functioning and family stress were also obtained. Fifty-one children (age range 2-18 years) who did not respond to sleep hygiene intervention were enrolled. Fifty patients completed the crossover trial and 47 completed the open-label phase. Recordings of total night-time sleep and sleep latency showed significant improvement of approximately 30 min. Similarly, significant improvement was observed in clinician and parent ratings. There was additional improvement in the open-label somnolog measures of sleep efficiency and the longest sleep episode in the open-label phase. Overall, the therapy improved the sleep of 47 children and was effective in reducing family stress. Children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, who had treatment resistant chronic delayed sleep phase syndrome and impaired sleep maintenance, showed improvement in melatonin therapy.

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