Weight Problems
339 Case Studies
97 Member Stories
82 Research

Why are weight problems bad for health?

Excess weight and obesity are known to raise blood pressure. Excess weight can increase your likelihood of developing other conditions, including high cholesterol, high blood sugar, and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is a phrase that means you've got a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher. Carrying excess pounds makes you more likely to have conditions such as:

- Diabetes

- Heart disease and stroke

- High blood pressure

- Some cancers

- Gallbladder disease and Infection

- Osteoarthritis

- Gout

- Breathing problems, such as sleep apnea (if a person stops breathing for brief episodes throughout sleep) and asthma

Not everyone who is obese has these issues. The risk rises if you've got a family history of a few of these ailments. Additionally, where your weight is may matter. When it's mostly around your belly (the "apple" shape), that may be riskier than if you've got a "pear" shape, meaning that your excess weight is mostly on your hips.

See: How to lose belly fat naturally

Can Ayurveda help with weight loss?

How does Ayurvedic weight loss help?

Among the main things you can do to lower your health risk is to keep your blood pressure in check. Losing weight may help you decrease your blood pressure. It could also boost your cholesterol and blood sugar, which might reduce your risk for many previously listed conditions.

Ayurveda is a health system from India around 5,000 years back. Even though it's among the world's oldest healthcare customs, countless people worldwide practice it now. In actuality, the prevalence of Ayurvedic medicine is growing.

Since Ayurveda focuses on mindful nutrition, stress reduction, and cultivation of a balanced lifestyle, lots of folks look to its dietary principles and natural remedies whenever they would like to shed weight. Ayurvedic eating habits, remedies, and nutritional supplements can help. Traditional western science is catching up with research and finding the efficacy of Ayurvedic weight loss procedures.

- Eating according to your dosha: Practitioners of the Ayurvedic tradition instruct that human beings need to balance three kinds of energy, and every energy is linked to natural components:

Vata. The energy of motion related to space and air.

Pitta. The energy of metabolism associated with water and fire.

Kapha. The energy of your body's construction related to earth and water.

Although all people have Vata, pitta, and Kapha doshas, a person's dosha is the kind of energy most dominant in your constitution. In the Ayurvedic tradition, how you eat should correspond with your dosha.

- Finding your dosha: Deciding your dosha could prove tricky to folks that are new to Ayurveda. Even though there are lists of features for every dosha online, the NAMA (National Ayurvedic Medical Association) recommends that you have a consultation with a trained Ayurvedic practitioner to find your dosha. Ayurvedic physicians are licensed and regulated in India, but there is no federally recognized certification or licensure process in the USA.

See: Dosha Quiz

Ayurvedic diet for weight problems

In the Ayurvedic tradition, your diet must correspond with your dosha.

Dietary recommendations for Vata-dominant individuals

- Incorporate a lot of cooked vegetables.

- Eat 3 to 4 small meals every day, at least two hours apart.

- Limit beans.

- Prevent nightshade veggies, like eggplants, peppers, tomatoes.

- Eat succulent, sweet fruits, and prevent astringent fruits such as cranberries and raw apples.

- Eat a vast array of nuts and seeds, particularly in the shape of nut milk.

- Avoid foods that are frozen, or extremely cold.

- Avoid addictive products, such as alcohol, sugar, and tobacco.

Dietary recommendations for pitta-dominant individuals

- Eat beans and lentils in moderate quantities.

- Eat raw vegetables and salads, particularly in spring and summer.

- Avoid seeds and nuts.

- Limit your consumption of animal foods such as meat, seafood, and eggs.

- Avoid spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol.

- Eat and drink dairy products, particularly the ones which have been sweetened.

Dietary recommendations for Kapha-dominant individuals

- Restrict protein.

- Eat a lot of leafy greens and vegetables grown above ground.

- Limit the number of food that you eat.

- Avoid dairy and foods high in fat.

- Eat astringent fruits such as apples, cranberries, mangoes, and peaches.

- Limit animal foods, nuts, and seeds.

Few studies have analyzed the efficacy of the Ayurvedic diets based on dosha type. But small pilot research of 22 participants in 2014 concluded that the diet, coupled with yoga exercise, did lead to significant weight reduction. Speak with a doctor before making substantial changes to your diet to be sure the actions you want to take are the ideal ones, given your general health.

Ayurvedic diet tips for weight loss

Ayurveda scholars have gathered lots of Ayurvedic practices that could be useful as part of a weight loss program.

- Exercise. Like eating, how and when you exercise ought to be compatible with your dosha. But physicians in Ayurvedic and allopathic (Western) medicine agree: If losing weight is your goal, exercise is an essential part of the strategy.

- Sleep well. Research shows that poor sleep is related to weight gain.

- Practice mindfulness, even as you eat. Adding meditation to your daily life can decrease the quantity of cortisol (the stress hormone related to weight gain). You can increase mindfulness by eating slowly and gently. 

- Eat your biggest meal throughout the day, not at night. Studies reveal that large caloric intake late in the day may result in obesity.

- Sip warm lemon water to begin your day as lemon water helps digestion.


See: Kapha Dosha Balancing

Ayurvedic herbs for weight loss

Ayurvedic weight loss remedies

Herbs and herbal remedies are a valuable part of the Ayurvedic tradition. A number of these herbal remedies have been in use for more than 1,000 years, but few have been investigated in clinical settings. In US, these remedies are controlled as supplements by the FDA and aren't subjected to the rigorous trials necessary for drugs. Ayurvedic remedies for weight loss include

- Triphala: Triphala combines three superfruits, is an herbal preparation that all of which increase in India: Amalaki (Indian gooseberry), Bibhitaki (Terminalia bellirica), and Haritaki (Terminalia chebula). A 2017 review of studies found that Triphala was effective in reducing blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Additionally, it led to greater weight loss for participants in one study.

- Guggul: Guggul is the dried resin of this Mukul myrrh tree. Although it's been used as a weight-loss aid in Ayurvedic medicine, clinical study on its effectiveness has generated conflicting results. One 2008 laboratory study revealed that the active ingredient in the Guggul study did cause fat cells to break down. 

- Vijayasar or Kino tree: Extracts from the vijayasar shrub (Pterocarpus marsupium), also referred to as the Kino tree, may help you to lose weight. 

- Kalonji: Kalonji, also called black seed or black cumin (Nigella sativa), has been studied extensively for various uses. In human research, Nigella sativa seeds and oils have improved weight loss for men and women living with obesity.

Other weight loss remedies: Ayurveda recommends these botanical or herbal remedies to assist with weight loss:

- lemon-honey

- ajwain

- cabbage horse gram

- pepper (piperine)

- punarnava

- aloe vera

- ginger-garlic lemon

See: Triphala Health Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

Is Ayurveda for weight loss safe?

Is Ayurveda safe?

Ayurvedic medicine has been in use for centuries. An Ayurvedic diet is rich in whole foods and wealth and a wide variety of vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. Ayurvedic diets emphasize moderation and mindful eating. Moreover, an Ayurvedic approach to healthcare emphasizes prevention, physical motion, stress reduction, and balanced living. All those principles and practices are safe and wholesome.

You might want to be careful when it comes to Ayurvedic herbal preparations, as the FDA doesn't regulate them. More study is needed to make sure they are safe and effective. You also need to conduct research when deciding which Ayurvedic professionals that you want to consult. Most American states do not license Ayurvedic practitioners, and there is no national certification or licensure requirement. Speak with your doctor about any suggestions you get to be sure they are appropriate, given your general health.

See: Ayurvedic Diet

Summary

Ayurvedic medicine is a holistic, prevention-oriented healthcare approach that originated in India about 5,000 years back. Ayurvedic diets are usually designed to encourage health in all three constitutions or doshas: Vata, pitta, and Kapha. Reducing calories, increasing physical activity, and finding support for your weight reduction goals are the best ways to shed weight. Certain foods and exercise practices are suggested for each dosha.  Ayurveda focuses on whole foods, exercise, stress reduction, and healthy sleep. There's a significant body of evidence to support these practices and their role in healthy living and weight loss. Opting to practice the Ayurvedic lifestyle will improve your health and make you more attentive to your intake, activity, and present state.



See: Ayurveda for heart health

References

1. Lad V. (2016). Ayurveda: A brief introduction and guide.  ayurveda.com/pdf/intro_ayurveda.pdf

2. Ogilvie RP, et al. (2017). The epidemiology of sleep and obesity. DOI: 10.1016/j.sleh.2017.07.013

3. Ayurvedic medicine: In depth. (2019).  nccih.nih.gov/health/ayurveda/introduction.htm

4. Bo S, et al. (2014). Consuming more of daily caloric intake at dinner predisposes to obesity. A 6-year population-based prospective cohort Study. DOI:  10.1371/journal.pone.0108467

5. Tavakkoli A, et al. (2017). Review on clinical trials of black seed (Nigella sativa ) and its active constituent, Thymoquinone. DOI:  10.3831/KPI.2017.20.021

6. Peterson C, et al. (2017) Therapeutic uses of triphala in Ayurvedic medicine. DOI:  10.1089/acm.2017.0083

7. Quadeer F, et al. (2018). Effect of pterocarpus marsupium in animal model of high carbohydrate diet-induced metabolic syndrome.  ejmanager.com/mnstemps/28/28-1533545749.pdf?t=1563155533

8. 7 reasons to start your day with lemon water. (2015).

health.clevelandclinic.org/7-reasons-to-start-your-day-with-lemon-water-infographic/

9. Yang J, et al. (2012). Guggulsterone inhibits adipocyte differentiation and induces apoptosis in 3T3‐L1 cells. DOI: 

10.1038/oby.2007.24

10. Food guidelines for basic constitutional types. (2018). ayurveda.com/pdf/food-guidelines.pdf

11. Rioux J, et al. (2014). A feasibility pilot study of whole-systems Ayurvedic medicine and yoga therapy for weight loss. DOI:  10.7453/gahmj.2013.084

12. Salkumar I, et al. (2017). Effect of guggulsterone on the expression of adiponectin in 3t3-l1 cells. 

researchgate.net/publication/325868052_Effect_of_guggulsterone_on_the_expression_of_adiponectin_in_3t3-l1_cells

See: Yoga to make you feel good all the time

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