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Food Allergies research studies for holistic treatments

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized
treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered
from their problems after food-allergies treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit
of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of food-allergies and related therapies
as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

/ title=”Cow’s Milk Allergy among Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux .”>
Cow’s Milk Allergy among Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux .

September 2011

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) and cow’s milk allergy (CMA) are two common conditions that occur in infancy. This study was performed to investigate the frequency of CMA in a group of patients with GERD.
METHODS:
Eighty-one children with signs and symptoms of GERD were enrolled in this study. All subjects received omeprazole for 4 weeks after the initial evaluation. Empirical elimination of cow’s milk from the diet was started for the patients who did not respond to the omeprazole treatment.
Results:
Seventy-two cases presented with gastrointestinal signs and symptoms, whereas the remaining nine cases presented with respiratory complaints. After the initial treatment with omeprazole, two thirds of the cases (54 patients, 66.7%) responded well, and all of their symptoms were resolved. Cow’s milk was eliminated from the diets of the remaining 27 patients. All signs and symptoms of GERD were resolved in this group after a 4 week elimination of cow’s milk from the diet. CONCLUSIONS: A diagnosis of CMA was considered in one third of the pediatric cases with signs and symptoms of GERD. This finding shows that CMA can mimic or aggravate all signs and symptoms of severe GERD during infancy.

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/ title=”Effect of cow’s milk exposure and maternal type 1 diabetes on cellular and humoral immunization to dietary insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. Finnish Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk Study Group.”>
Effect of cow’s milk exposure and maternal type 1 diabetes on cellular and humoral immunization to dietary insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. Finnish Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk Study Group.

October 2000

Type 1 diabetes is considered to be a T-cell-mediated autoimmune in which insulin-producing beta-cells are destroyed. Immunity to insulin has been suggested to be one of the primary autoimmune mechanisms leading to islet cell destruction. We have previously shown that the first immunization to insulin occurs by exposure to bovine insulin (BI) in cow’s milk (CM) formula. In this study, we analyzed the development of insulin-specific T-cell responses by proliferation test, emergence of insulin-binding antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, and insulin autoantibodies by radioimmunoassay in relation to CM exposure and family history of type 1 diabetes in infants with a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes and increased genetic risk for the . The infants were randomized to receive either an adapted CM-based formula or a hydrolyzed casein (HC)-based formula after breast-feeding for the first 6-8 months of life. At the age of 3 months, both cellular and humoral responses to BI were higher in infants exposed to CM formula than in infants fully breast-fed (P = 0.015 and P = 0.007). IgG antibodies to BI were higher in infants who received CM formula than in infants who received HC formula at 3 months of age (P = 0.01), but no difference in T-cell responses was seen between the groups. T-cell responses to BI at 9 months of age (P = 0.05) and to human insulin at 12 (P = 0.014) and 24 months of age (P = 0.009) as well as IgG antibodies to BI at 24 months of age (P = 0.05) were lower in children with a diabetic mother than in children with a diabetic father or a sibling, suggesting possible tolerization to insulin by maternal insulin therapy. The priming of insulin-specific humoral and T-cell immunity occurs in early infancy by dietary insulin, and this phenomenon is influenced by maternal type 1 diabetes.

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/ title=”Cow’s milk formula feeding induces primary immunization to insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.”>
Cow’s milk formula feeding induces primary immunization to insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

July 1999

Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) often appear as the first sign of islet cell autoimmunity in prediabetic children. Because cow’s milk contains bovine insulin, we followed the development of insulin-binding antibodies in children fed with cow’s milk formula. Bovine insulin- and human insulin-binding antibodies by enzyme immunoassay and IAA by radioimmunoassay were analyzed in 200 infants carrying HLA-DQB1*0302 but no protective alleles who participated in a Finnish population-based birth-cohort study. Based on the prospectively registered information, the first 100 infants enrolled in the study who were exposed to cow’s milk formula before age 12 weeks and the first 100 infants enrolled in the study who were exclusively breast-fed for longer than their first 12 weeks of life were selected for the present study. Also, 11 children from the birth cohort who developed at least two diabetes-associated autoantibodies, 98 children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, and 92 healthy children were studied. We found that the amount of IgG-antibodies binding to bovine insulin was higher at age 3 months in infants who were exposed to cow’s milk formula than in infants who were exclusively breast-fed at that age (median 0.521 vs. 0.190; P

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/ title=”Butyrophilin, a milk protein, modulates the encephalitogenic T cell response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.”>
Butyrophilin, a milk protein, modulates the encephalitogenic T cell response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

September 2000

Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by sensitization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune that reproduces the inflammatory demyelinating pathology of multiple sclerosis. We report that an encephalitogenic T cell response to MOG can be either induced or alternatively suppressed as a consequence of immunological cross-reactivity, or “molecular mimicry” with the extracellular IgV-like domain of the milk protein butyrophilin (BTN). In the Dark Agouti rat, active immunization with native BTN triggers an inflammatory response in the CNS characterized by the formation of scattered meningeal and perivascular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages. We demonstrate that this pathology is mediated by a MHC class II-restricted T cell response that cross-reacts with the MOG peptide sequence 76-87, I GEG KVA LRIQ N (identities underlined). Conversely, molecular mimicry with BTN can be exploited to suppress activity in MOG-induced EAE. We demonstrate that not only is EAE mediated by the adoptive transfer of MOG74-90 T cell lines markedly ameliorated by i.v. treatment with the homologous BTN peptide, BTN74-90, but that this protective effect is also seen in actively induced following transmucosal (intranasal) administration of the peptide. These results identify a mechanism by which the consumption of milk products may modulate the pathogenic autoimmune response to MOG.

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/ title=”Specific IgE to Common Food Allergens in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.”>
Specific IgE to Common Food Allergens in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

March 2012

Background:
Atopic dermatitis is a major public health problem, often starting in early childhood and sometimes followed by other allergic s. Although hypersensitivity to foods is assumed to play an essential role in the development of atopic dermatitis in some patients, little is known about common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. OBJECTIVES:
This study was designed to identify probable food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis and find the relationship between food sensitization and the severity of atopic dermatitis.
METHODS:
This study included 90 children aged 2-48 months with atopic dermatitis. Skin prick tests for cow’s milk, hen’s egg, almond, potato and soybean were done. Serum specific IgE to 20 food allergens was also screened.
Results:
Among children with atopic dermatitis, the frequency of food sensitization was 40% by skin prick test and 51% by food-specific IgE. Children with atopic dermatitis were most commonly sensitized to cow’s milk (31%), hen’s egg (17.7%), tree nuts (17.7%), wheat (12.2%), potato (11.1%), tomato (8.8%) and peanut (8.8%). In 42 children with moderate to severe eczema, sensitivity to food allergens was 78.5% by skin prick test and 88% by serum specific IgE evaluation.
Conclusion:
Our results showed that cow’s milk, hen’s egg and tree nuts were the most common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. Sensitization to foods was much higher in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Determining specific IgE in children with atopic dermatitis can be helpful in managing these patients.

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/ title=”Consumption of cow’s milk as a cause of iron deficiency in infants and toddlers.”>
Consumption of cow’s milk as a cause of iron deficiency in infants and toddlers.

November 2011

Consumption of cow’s milk (CM) by infants and toddlers has adverse effects on their iron stores, a finding that has been well documented in many localities. Several mechanisms have been identified that may contribute to iron deficiency in this young population group. The most important of these is probably the low iron content of CM, which makes it difficult for infants to obtain the amounts of iron needed for growth. A second mechanism is the occult intestinal blood loss associated with CM consumption during infancy, a condition that affects about 40% of otherwise healthy infants. Loss of iron in the form of blood diminishes with age and ceases after the age of 1 year. A third mechanism is the inhibition of non-heme iron absorption by calcium and casein, both of which are present in high amounts in CM. Fortification of CM with iron, as practiced in some countries, can protect infants and toddlers against CM’s negative effects on iron status. Consumption of CM produces a high renal solute load, which leads to a higher urine solute concentration than consumption of breast milk or formula, thereby narrowing the margin of safety during dehydrating events, such as diarrhea. The high protein intake from CM may also place infants at increased risk of obesity in later childhood. It is thus recommended that unmodified, unfortified CM not be fed to infants and that it be fed to toddlers in modest amounts only.

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