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Dementia research studies for holistic treatments

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized
treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered
from their problems after dementia treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit
of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of dementia and related therapies
as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

/ title=”Phytopharmaceutical treatment of anxiety, depression, and dementia in the elderly: evidence from randomized, controlled clinical trials.”>
Phytopharmaceutical treatment of anxiety, depression, and dementia in the elderly: evidence from randomized, controlled clinical trials.

June 2015

Based on subgroup analyses of randomized, controlled clinical trials, we review the efficacy of three phytopharmaceutical drugs, respectively of the corresponding active substances silexan® (WS® 1265, lavender oil) in anxiety disorders, WS® 5570 (Hypericum extract) in major depression, and EGb 761® (Ginkgo biloba extract) in Alzheimer, vascular, or mixed type dementia, in elderly patients aged ??60 years.Four trials were eligible in each indication. Meta-analyses and analysesbased on pooled raw data showed that the three drugs were significantly superior to placebo in the elderly subset, and that their treatment effects reflected in the main outcome measures (Hamilton Anxiety scale, Hamilton Depression scale, Neuropsychiatric Inventory) were comparable with those observed in the original trials without age restrictions.The results confirm the efficacy of the three herbal active substances in elderly patients of ??60 years of age. In anxiety, depression, and dementia, they thus represent efficacious and well-tolerated alternatives to synthetic drugs.

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/ title=”Ginkgo biloba special extract in dementia with neuropsychiatric features. A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.”>
Ginkgo biloba special extract in dementia with neuropsychiatric features. A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

January 2007

Background:
In previous trials of the Ginkgo biloba special extract EGb 761 improvements in cognitive functioning and behavioural symptoms were found in patients with aging-associated cognitive impairment or dementia. This trial was undertaken to assess the efficacy of EGb 761 in mild to moderate dementia with neuropsychiatric features.
METHODS:
Double-blind trial including 400 patients aged 50 years or above with Alzheimer’s (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD), randomized to receive EGb 761 or placebo for 22 weeks. Patients scored below 36 on the Test for the Early Detection of Dementia with Discrimination from Depression (TE4D), between 9 and 23 on the SKT test battery and at least 5 on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI).
Results:
There was a mean -3.2-point improvement in the SKT upon EGb 761 treatment and an average deterioration by +1.3 points on placebo (p < 0.001, two-sided, ANOVA). EGb 761 was significantly superior to placebo on all secondary outcome measures, including the NPI and an activities-of-daily-living scale. Treatment results were essentially similar for AD and VaD subgroups. The drug was well tolerated; adverse events were no more frequent under drug than under placebo treatment.
Conclusion:
The data add further evidence on the safety and efficacy of EGb 761 in the treatment of cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms of dementia.

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/ title=”Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.”>
Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

May 2016

Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n?=?414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-?) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental-State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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/ title=”Diet and Alzheimer’s risk factors or prevention: the current evidence.”>
Diet and Alzheimer’s risk factors or prevention: the current evidence.

May 2011

Preventing or postponing the onset of Alzheimer’s (AD) and delaying or slowing its progression would lead to a consequent improvement of health status and quality of life in older age. Elevated saturated fatty acids could have negative effects on age-related cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Furthermore, at present, epidemiological evidence suggests a possible association between fish consumption, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; in particular, n-3 PUFA) and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Poorer cognitive function and an increased risk of vascular dementia (VaD) were found to be associated with a lower consumption of milk or dairy products. However, the consumption of whole-fat dairy products may be associated with cognitive decline in the elderly. Light-to-moderate alcohol use may be associated with a reduced risk of incident dementia and AD, while for VaD, cognitive decline and predementia syndromes, the current evidence is only suggestive of a protective effect. The limited epidemiological evidence available on fruit and vegetable consumption and cognition generally supports a protective role of these macronutrients against cognitive decline, dementia and AD. Only recently, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet was associated with decreased cognitive decline, although the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) combines several foods, micro- and macro-nutrients already separately proposed as potential protective factors against dementia and predementia syndromes. In fact, recent prospective studies provided evidence that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet could be associated with slower cognitive decline, reduced risk of progression from MCI to AD, reduced risk of AD and a decreased all-cause mortality in AD patients. These findings suggested that adherence to the MeDi may affect not only the risk of AD, but also of predementia syndromes and their progression to overt dementia. Based on the current evidence concerning these factors, no definitive dietary recommendations are possible. However, following dietary advice for lowering the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, high levels of consumption of fats from fish, vegetable oils, nonstarchy vegetables, low glycemic index fruits and a diet low in foods with added sugars and with moderate wine intake should be encouraged. Hopefully this will open new opportunities for the prevention and management of dementia and AD.

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