The six tastes in the Ayurvedic Diet


According to Ayurveda, each taste used collectively or individually in the appropriate dose brings about balance of all the bodily systems and yields happiness and good health to all living beings. But if used improperly, much harm can result. So one should learn the normal and abnormal effects of these six tastes and make use of them properly in daily routine. 

Sweet (madhura), Sour (amla), Salty (lavana), Bitter (tikta), Astringent (Kashāya), Pungent (katu)

The six tastes and you!

The combination of tastes that’s right for you depends a lot on YOU - your constitution, your imbalances, your age & your environment. A balanced diet will include an appropriate quantity of each of the six tastes, according to one’s constitution (prakriti), one’s current state (vikriti), the season, one’s environment & one’s age, and your diet should change accordingly over time.

 

Developing a deepened connection with taste can unravel your unique strengths, vulnerabilities & needs. Notice which foods you combine together. Notice which meals are difficult to digest and see what foods you combined in that meal, and maybe try changing it up. How often do you indulge in combinations of foods? Become aware of how you feel afterwards. Do these choices affect your energy level, digestion, elimination and the coating on your tongue? These are all important pieces of information. By doing this you will begin to identify the importance of diet & proper food combining.


Remember; Ease into it, the first step is being aware of what, when, how and why you eat and how it affects you.

More information on Rasa;

 

Rasa is one of the 24 principles of creation according to Sankhya; which is a philosophy developed in india to discover & understand the truth of life. Rasa (taste) is an object of sensory perception. It forms part of the 5 Tanmātrās; which is the word used in Sanskrit for objects of sensory perception. The other objects being sound (shabda), touch (sparsha), form (rupa) & odor (gandha). Rasa is closely related to the tongue, due to the tongue having all your taste buds.





Mung Dal Kitchari Recipe - Tridoshic meal

Ingredients:

Serves 3-4

INGREDIENTS

·       1 cup/200g yellow mung dal*

·       ½ cup/100g white basmati rice**

·       2 tbs ghee (or coconut oil) ***

·       4 cardamom pods, cracked (just bite between your teeth!)

·       2 cloves

·       2 bay leaves

1 teaspoon of:

·       Black pepper

·       Ground coriander

·       Ground cumin

·       Fennel seeds

·       Ground ginger

·       Sea salt

2 teaspoons of:

·       Black mustard seeds

·       Cumin seeds

·       Turmeric

R


Lad, Vasant. The Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume One. The Ayurvedic press: Albuquerque, 2002.

 

  Banyabotanical.com. (2019). What is Kitchari & Why We Eat It for Cleansing. [online]

Available at: http//www.botanicals.com/info/blog-the-banya-insight/details/what-is-kitchari-why-we-eat-it-for-cleansing/ [Accessed 26 May 2019]

 

 



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1 teaspoon of:

·       Black pepper

·       Ground coriander

·       Ground cumin

·       Fennel seeds

·       Ground ginger

·       Sea salt

2 teaspoons of:

·       Black mustard seeds

·       Cumin seeds

·       Turmeric

 

METHOD

1.    Rinse the mung dal and rice until the water runs clear. 

2.    Measure out all of the spices into a cup — this makes it less likely that you'll burn your spices while searching for the others.

3.    Heat the ghee or oil in a large pot. Add all of the spices and sauté together on a medium heat for a minute until fragrant. Be careful not to overdo this stage — it's better to err on the side of caution on your first attempt than risk frazzling the spices and making them bitter or burnt.

4.    Stir in the mung dal and rice. Add 5 cups of water and any chopped vegetables. Bring to the boil then reduce to a simmer, lid on.

5.    Cook for at least 40 minutes (longer if using whole green mung beans), or until the dal and rice are completely soft (easily squashed between finger and thumb), the kitchari has a porridge-like consistency and the ghee has risen to the top, adding more water if necessary. Adjust the seasoning and garnish with fresh chopped herbs if you like.

  (Hemsley, 2019)

Reference & Suggested Readings;

  Lad, Vasant. The Textbook of Ayurveda, Volume One. The Ayurvedic press: Albuquerque, 2002.

 

  Banyabotanical.com. (2019). What is Kitchari & Why We Eat It for Cleansing. [online]

Available at: http//www.botanicals.com/info/blog-the-banya-insight/details/what-is-kitchari-why-we-eat-it-for-cleansing/ [Accessed 26 May 2019]

 

  Jasmine Hemsley. (2019). KITCHARI - EVERY WHICH WAY. [online] Available at: https://www.jasminehemsley.com/food-blog/2017/12/30/kitchari-every-which-way [Accessed 26 May 2019].

 

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