How This Helps

A deep acting constitutional remedy along with the counseling is required to treat an eating disorder. However, fear of weight gain and acquiring some disease or anxiety about the amount of food intake3, anxiety about health are the common symptoms experienced by persons requiring arsenic. 

Science and Research

Eating disorders are commonly seen in young adults and teenagers. They produce severe disturbances in an everyday pattern of eating and are often related to psychiatric conditions where the person is obsessed with their weight1.  

What are eating disorders?

The common eating disorders include Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia nervosa, and Binge-eating disorder. An eating disorder reflects a whole obsession with body image and food. This compulsion can be so intense that it becomes the focus of the entire existence and cripples them from working day today in the actual world. The starvation can start as early as birth. When caregivers do not correctly comfort and nurture infants, these kids grow up not understanding how to soothe in a wholesome way. Instead, they have to find abnormal amounts of outside comfort or relief. Caregivers, who don't correctly listen, acknowledge, and validate, make it hard for kids, in turn, to learn how to validate themselves. This leads to distorted, negative self-images or no self-image in any respect.

Previous attempts to get attention and love have brought frustration, disappointment, or even misuse. They then resort to eating disorders as a substitute. They cope with indigestible facts and feelings by eating or not eating them soothing their harm by eating or not eating meals, and amassing self-esteem in view of their capacity to control food as they want. Their self-esteem is dependent on how well they control this food ingestion. If they fail in controlling their eating habits (and they will because most of us have the natural instinct to nourish our bodies), they follow by abusing their own bodies with starvation or purging. This vicious cycle then repeats over again.

- In Anorexia nervosa, people think themselves to be overweight, even though they have a healthy weight or are even underweight, due to an extreme fear of weight gain. 

- In Bulimia, also called Bulimia Nervosa, there is a tendency to uncontrolled eating, often done secretly, and associated with a fear of gaining weight. It is followed by forced vomiting, purging, severe dieting or exercise. This repeated binge-and-purge cycle may lead to damage to your digestive system and create chemical imbalances in the body which damage the functioning of major organs, including the heart. It can even be deadly. While it is most common among young girls, bulimia can affect men and women of all ages.

- Persons with Binge eating disorder lose control of eating and are commonly overweight. They are mostly at risk because of obesity and the risk of cardiovascular disorders.

Many people turn to food when feeling bored, lonely, or stressed. But if you're suffering from the eating disorder bulimia, overeating is more like a compulsion. Afterward, rather than eating sensibly to make up for it, you punish yourself by purging, fasting, or exercising to eliminate the calories. The endless cycle of binging and purging takes a toll on your body and psychological well-being. However, the cycle can be broken. With the support and treatment, you can create a healthy relationship with food, overcome your feelings of anxiety, guilt, and shame, and regain control of your life.

See: High Protein Low Carb Diet for Diabetes

How can you heal eating disorders?

So as to stop bingeing, you've got to learn how to fulfill your requirements on a deeper level, so that overeating doesn't satisfy you anymore. Take the time to learn what you are really searching for and pursue it with different means. Sometimes, we're extremely hungry, and that's the reason we eat at night. That is especially true if we didn't take the time to eat throughout the day properly. Other times, we just eat due to our emotions.

If you are trying to use food to overcome stress or sadness, frustration, or anger, then you may not be hungry and should attempt to control these feelings along with different ways. If you're eating plenty of food but do not appear to have control over it, you may be subject to binge eating.

Try to identify if your night eating is physical or psychological so as to understand how to stop eating at night. If you're craving sweets or salty comfort foods, you probably feel emotional hunger. If you're skipping meals during the day or if you're on a restrictive diet, you have more opportunities to be physically hungry at night.

- Find the main difference between your physical and emotional hunger.

We utilize food for different reasons. Looking at why we consume and what we actually want from food is a step in the right direction so as to understand how to stop eating at night.

- Find out the source of why you're eating at night.

If you eat a lot in the day or at night and would like to change this habit, you'll need to learn why. This may come from limitations during the day, customs or boredom, or by an eating disorder, which might adversely affect your health like weight gain, obesity, and depression.

- Food is a reward for plenty of people. In addition, it can be comforting to look for happiness or pleasure. When you look deeply into the reasons why it is you're eating and try to meet those reasons with something else, then it's possible to overtime change bad eating habits.

- You can begin to view food as nourishment for your body. Food is the fuel used for action, and it's important to care about what you eat just. You need to focus on quality and diversity in regards to snacks and meals. Your activity level is extremely low at night. Overeating then causes your body to store fat for energy, not burn it. What's more, if you sleep, your body will regenerate and heal itself. That's the reason it is essential to eat healthy foods and give your digestive system enough time to work ahead.

- Adopting a healthy regimen could be the best way to learn how to stop eating at night. You may try to get into a healthy routine so as to eat enough throughout the day. It may take plenty of practice and time at first that you change your habits, but it's worth it for your health & well being.

- Try to schedule your meals and sleeping times to disperse your food intake over the day and feel less hungry at night doing this.

- Do not neglect sleep. Having enough time to rest is crucial to decrease the risk of weight gain and obesity. You should aim to fully separate eating from sleeping as much as you can.

- Feeling full and satisfied throughout the day is critical to embrace a healthy lifestyle and reduce your appetite at night.

- You can attempt using health and natural supplements to lower cravings out, under the guidance of health experts.

- Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may have very positive effects on hormone, blood glucose, and insulin levels. They can help prevent cravings, which you might have in the day or at night.

- Some natural superfoods made from seaweed might also be useful to take before and after you eat in powder or capsules. They are quite rich in dietary fiber and effective at making the body feel full and satisfied.

- Some amino acids, such as chromium found in green tea, may also help balance your hormones, prevent your cravings, and restrict body fat storage as much as possible.

- Avoid late-night cravings by getting into a positive mindset. It's ideal for replacing instant delights with long-term ones. Remind yourself of all of the efforts you've made so far to accomplish your targets.

- Consider the future and imagine all the things that you need to accomplish in the years to come. Envision the best-life minutes that await you. These positive thoughts and images will have a magical transformation of your mood.

- Be grateful for all of the individuals and occasions in your life that are really important to you. And then, you'll have the capacity to pass unhealthy temptations that please you just short term.

- By substituting all negative emotions with positive and strong ones, we actually can achieve what we truly are supposed to.


See: Ashwagandha for sleep before bed

Homeopathy for emotional eating

Homeopathy Remedies for emotional eating

Homeopathy takes a holistic approach to the treatment of eating disorders. It considers a person’s mental as well as physical health to choose the right remedy for the person. The right remedy can treat the mental situation of the patient leading to these eating disorders as well. A detailed case taking along with the mental symptoms will help to select the right remedy.



Expert Says:

Arsenic Album is a remedy which is shown great effects in treating eating disorders where it is accompanied by tremendous fear and anxiety in general.        

Recommended Dosage:
 Arsenic Album 200C, 4 pills as a single dose, constitutional remedy. 

Please note: For patient-specific treatments and dosage, always consult with a homeopathic doctor before beginning treatment.

See: How to stop binge eating at night

References

1.    Binge eating and emotional eating behaviors among adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder. Martin K, Woo J, Timmins V, Collins J, Islam A, Newton D, Goldstein BI.J Affect Disord. 2016 Feb 10;195:88-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.02.030.PMID:26890288
2.    Understanding Eating Disorders by LeeAnn Alexander-Mott, D. Barry Lumsden
3.     HOMŒOPATHIC MATERIA MEDICA by William BOERICKE, M.D. Presented by Médi-T

4.  http://www.repertorium-online.de/homoeopathische-mittel/Arsenicum-Album.html 

5. Allison, K.C., Grilo, C.M., Masheb, R.M., and Stunkard, A.J., 2005. Binge eating disorder & night eating syndrome: a comparative study of disordered eating. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 73(6), p.1107.

6. Kucukgoncu, S., Midura, M., and Tek, C., 2015. Optimal management of night eating syndrome: challenges & solutions. Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment, 11, p.751.

7. Rogers, P.J., 1999. Eating habits and appetite control: a psychobiological perspective. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 58(1), pp.59-67.

8. Brownley, K.A., Berkman, N.D., Peat, C.M., Lohr, K.N., Cullen, K.E., Bann, C.M., and Bulik, C.M., 2016. Binge-eating disorder in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Annals of Internal Medicine, 165(6), pp.409-420.

9. Citrome, L., 2015. A primer on binge eating disorder diagnosis and management. CNS spectrums, 20(S1), pp.41-51.

10. Zawilska, J.B., Santorek-Strumiłło, E.J., and Kuna, P., 2010. Nighttime eating disorders--clinical symptoms and treatment. Przeglad lekarski, 67(7), pp.536-540.

See: Ayurvedic Treatment for Prediabetes & Diabetes Type 2

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