What is a good snack for diabetics?

Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult once you have diabetes.

The secret is to choose snacks that are high in protein, fiber, and healthful fats. These nutrients will help keep your glucose levels in check. Diabetics often complain about weight gain, so they should be conscious of the calorie count. Additionally, it is critical to bite on nutrient-dense foods that promote general health. Snacking if you have diabetes does not have to be hard. There are many easy snacks you can prepare and eat even if you're on-the-go. It is crucial to prevent a sugar crash or a carbohydrate overload. It's smart to keep snacks to about 200 calories or not, and make sure they are:

- high in protein

- high in fiber

- sources of healthy fats

- nutrient-dense

- low in added sugars

Most whole, unprocessed foods such as vegetables, seeds, nuts, and several fruits boast at least one of these advantages.

See: Oatmeal for diabetes health benefits

Snacks nutrition facts

High-protein foods contain essential amino acids that power your body and keep you working at your best. Snacks with protein are perfect because they keep your blood sugar stable and keep you full for hours.

The American Diabetes Association recommends many different high-quality plant and animal proteins, particularly those low in carbs and low in saturated fat. High-protein snack ideas include:

One big hard-boiled egg -- 6 gram

fruit with two tablespoons nut butter -- 8 grams

Five tablespoons hummus and veggie sticks -- about 5 grams

1 cup of cottage cheese -- 25 gram

a couple of almonds, pecans, or other nuts -- roughly 15 gram

One big piece of beef jerky (no added sugar) -- 1 gram

5 ounce of tuna -- 10 gram

1 cup edamame -- 17 gram

1 cup roasted chickpeas -- 15 gram

one stick of part-skim string cheese -- 1 gram

See: Almonds health benefits and nutrition facts

Best snacks for diabetics

Diabetics often complain about weight gain, and that's why they ought to be mindful of the calorie count. Here are some ideas you can try.


Hard-Boiled Eggs

Hard-boiled eggs are a super, healthier snack for individuals with diabetes. Their protein content makes them glow. One large hard-boiled egg packs 6 grams of protein, which can be great for diabetes. In one study, 65 individuals with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. From the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting glucose levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c. Eggs are proven to encourage fullness, an essential element of managing type 2 diabetes. This disorder is associated with a higher likelihood of becoming obese and developing cardiovascular disease. You may enjoy hard-. boiled egg or 2 to get a snack by themselves or mix them with a healthy topping like guacamole.

Egg Muffins

Egg muffins are created by mixing eggs and then baking them in a muffin tin. They make a fast, healthy snack for individuals with diabetes. This diabetes-friendly food's principal advantages would be the protein in the eggs and fiber from the veggies. 

- Yogurt with Berries

Yogurt with berries is a tremendous diabetes-friendly snack for an assortment of reasons. The antioxidants in berries may decrease inflammation and protect against damage to the pancreas cells, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that reduce blood glucose levels. Furthermore, berries are a terrific source of fiber.  Yogurt is also famous for its ability to reduce blood sugar levels. This property is partly because of the probiotics it contains, which might enhance your body's ability to metabolize foods with sugar. Yogurt is full of protein, which is well known for keeping glucose levels in check. Greek yogurt is exceptionally high in protein. Yogurt and berries go well together in a snack, as the berries' sweetness helps balance the tartness of the yogurt. You may just combine them or layer them on top of one another to create a parfait.

-  Veggies and Hummus

Hummus is a creamy spread from chickpeas. Vegetables and hummus are great sources of fiber, minerals, and vitamins. Additionally, hummus provides a great deal of protein. You can experiment with dipping several kinds of veggies in hummus, such as broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and bell peppers.

-  Avocado

In case you have diabetes, snacking avocado might help manage your glucose levels. You can eat avocado by itself, or turn it into a dip like guacamole. Since avocados are very high in calories, one-fourth an avocado.

- Apples 

Sliced apples make for a delicious and healthy snack that is terrific for individuals with diabetes. Apples are rich in many nutrients, including B vitamins, vitamin C, and potassium. At the same time, peanut butter offers considerable amounts of vitamin E, magnesium, and manganese, all of which are proven to help manage diabetes. Both apples and peanut butter are also relatively high in fiber. One medium apple combined with 1 oz (28 g ) of peanut butter supplies nearly 7 grams of fiber that can help keep your blood glucose in check. Apples have been studied mainly for their prospective function in diabetes control. The polyphenol antioxidants they contain are considered to protect pancreatic tissues from damage, which often worsens diabetes. You can even try pairing other kinds of fruit with peanut butter, like bananas or pears, for comparable health benefits.

Almonds

Almonds are incredibly nutritious and convenient to bite on. A 1-ounce serving of almonds provides more than 15 vitamins and minerals, including 32 percent of the recommended daily intake for manganese, 19 percent for magnesium, and 17% for riboflavin. Research has shown almonds can help control blood glucose in people with diabetes. Almonds' capability to help stabilize blood glucose is probably due to the mix of protein, fiber, and healthful fats they contain, all of which are known to have an essential role in diabetes control. What is more, almonds have been shown to benefit heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and may also promote weight control, both of which are important factors in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes. Since almonds are very high in calories, it's better to limit your portion size to about a few as a snack.

- Sprouts: Sprout your favorite legumes and lentils together - mung, black beans, chickpeas, or anything you like. Toss in and mix it up with chopped tomatoes, a pinch of chaat masala, and lime juice. Lentils and legumes are an excellent source of fiber, which takes time to digest; it also enables the slow release of sugar from the bloodstream, preventing blood glucose spikes.

- Fruit Chaat: This can be a favorite way to snack on fruit. Fresh and delectable fruit chaat is a joy at any time of the day. Diabetics should eat fruits that are high on fiber and low in glycaemic index. The glycaemic index is a comparative ranking given to carbs based on how they affect our blood glucose levels. Guavas, apples, kiwi, and berries are among the greatest low-cal and low sugar fruits for diabetes. Diabetics should ideally prevent fruits such as banana and mango.

- Tofu tikka: Tofu is the vegan cousin of paneer, but is a powerhouse of protein. A hundred grams of tofu includes eight grams of protein. Since tikka isn't deep-fried, it saves you an astonishing number of calories too.

- Oats Uthappam: The South-Indian rice pancake receives a nutritional supplement with this yummy recipe. Delicious and dense in nutrients, oats are packaged with both fibers and protein. It can fill you up and also help keeps the blood sugar spike in check. Here's a delicious recipe for the same.

- Sweet Potato Toast

Even when you're avoiding sugary refined bread, you can still enjoy all of the unbelievable gourmet toasts everyone is buzzing about. When the sweet potato pieces are crisped to perfection, top them with avocado, tahini, almond butter, mustard, or whatever else you enjoy.

- Organic Beet Chips

These beets have all of the feels of potato chips, and they comprise a lot more beneficial nutrients. These pure and simple, convenient beet chips are ready to bite on.  The beets are dried so that they won't make your palms all red, but they still have all of the fantastic stuff from the fresh veggies, such as iron and fiber.

- Almond Macarons

Almond flour, egg whites, and healthy sugar replacement possess the capacity to create a beautiful Italian macaron, which produces the perfect treat when you want it.

- Barley Salad

Low on the glycemic index, barley is the perfect grain for those who have diabetes. When it is added to a salad of lentils, tomatoes, feta, capers, and green onions, it takes on Mediterranean tastes in addition to any couscous. Only 1/2 cup of barley has 16 grams of fiber, making it a perfectly filling foundation for many different diabetic-friendly snacks.

- Honeydew Melon with Yogurt Sauce

Replace vanilla yogurt for plain yogurt to further reduce the glucose content in this snack, a bite that feels like way more of a treat than a simple piece of fruit. Slice up healthy honeydew melon, drizzle it with yogurt, and sprinkle it with pistachios and lime zest to experience flavors worthy of a traditional gelateria.

- Garam Masala Eggplant Chips

Create your chips from eggplant, an unsung healthy-eating hero that is too often relegated to cheesy Italian dishes. When you scatter eggplant with garam masala and bake it until crisp, it creates a delicate chip having an incredible quantity of flavor.

- Salted Peanuts

Salted peanuts create a remarkably healthy snack daily, any time.

- Watermelon Chaat Masala and Mint Salad

Watermelon, ginger, mint, and chaat masala, an Indian spice, create an utterly intriguing flavor combination. When the mixture is put on healthy mini wheat toasts, it produces a memorable snack that is excellent for diabetics and anyone else that wants a bit more taste in their lives.

- Fruit Salsa and Chips

Transform cubes of fresh fruit into an unbelievable salsa with orange juice and a bit of honey. 

Collectively, these sweet chips and fruity salsa make an ideal snack or a perfect light dessert. One serving, which is approximately eight chips and 1/3 cup of salsa, has only 3.5 grams of added sugar.

- Beef Sticks

Beef sticks are convenient, mobile, and diabetes-friendly. Beef sticks, an excellent snack for individuals with diabetes, are their high protein and low carb contents. Most beef sticks supply approximately 6 grams of protein per ounce (28 g ), which might help keep your blood glucose in check. If possible, you need to pick beef sticks that are made out of grass-fed beef. In comparison to grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in omega-3 fatty acids, known for their possible role in maintaining blood sugar levels stable. As beef sticks may be high in sodium, be sure that you eat them in moderation.

- Roasted Chickpeas

Chickpeas or garbanzo beans are a remarkably healthy legume. There are close to 15 g of protein and 13 grams of fiber at a 1-cup (164-gram) serving of chickpeas, making them an exceptional snack for individuals with diabetes. Studies have shown that regularly consuming chickpeas may play a role in preventing the development of diabetes, as a result of their capability to help manage glucose levels.

- Turkey 

Turkey is a simple snack - there is nothing to make. You can make a wrap consisting of turkey breast slices wrapped around low-carb contents of your own choice, such as veggies and cheese. Turkey roll-ups are a terrific snack option for diabetes individuals because of their low carb and higher protein contents. One wrap supplies about 5 grams of protein, which will help prevent your glucose levels from rising too high.

- Cottage Cheese

Cottage cheese is a superb snack for individuals with diabetes. A half-cup (roughly 112-gram) serving of small-curd cottage cheese offers several minerals and vitamins, along with nearly 13 grams of protein and only 4 grams of carbohydrates. Interestingly, eating cottage cheese can help manage your blood glucose. In one study, men who ate 25 g of cottage cheese with 50 g of sugar had 38 percent lower blood glucose afterward than people who consumed sugar. The blood sugar-lowering ramifications of cottage cheese are often attributed to its high protein content. If you choose regular cottage cheese instead of reduced-fat varieties, you will also benefit from the blood-sugar-lowering properties of fat. Cottage cheese tastes great plain, but you may also combine it with fruit for extra fiber and nutrients.

- Cheese and Whole-Grain Crackers

Cracker sandwiches are a favorite snack, and you can make them on your own by topping a couple of whole-grain crackers with cheese slices. They're a fantastic snack choice when you have diabetes. While carbohydrates can be high in carbohydrates, the fat from the crackers' cheese and fiber may keep them from spiking blood glucose. Fat intake from dairy products like cheese can slow the digestion of carbohydrates, reduce insulin levels, and encourage the release of hormones that reduce blood glucose, such as GLP-1. Be sure that you select your crackers carefully, as many manufacturers are high in processed flour and additional sugar, which might negatively affect glucose levels. To prevent these ingredients, always select crackers made with 100 percent whole grains.

- Tuna Salad

Tuna salad is created by mixing tuna with mayonnaise and other ingredients, such as onions and celery. Additionally, tuna is full of omega-3 fatty acids, which were proven to help manage diabetes because of their capacity to lower inflammation and enhance blood sugar control. You may make tuna salad healthier and high in protein by mixing it with cottage cheese or yogurt instead of mayonnaise.

- Popcorn

Popcorn is a trendy and healthy whole-grain snack food. It's been deemed among the greatest snack foods for those who have diabetes, partly due to its low-calorie density. One cup (8 g ) of air-popped popcorn contains only 31 calories. Snacking on low-carb foods may aid weight reduction, which is proven to encourage decreased blood glucose levels.

Additionally, popcorn supplies 1 gram of fiber per 1-cup (8-gram) serving, which is another property making it a diabetes-friendly food. Because most prepackaged popcorn is full of salt, trans fats, and other unhealthy ingredients, it's advisable to air-pop your own.

Chia Seed Pudding

Chia seed batter is made by soaking chia seeds in milk until the mixture achieves a pudding-like consistency. It's a wholesome snack for individuals with diabetes since chia seeds are rich in many nutrients, which help stabilize blood sugar, such as fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. The fiber in chia seeds can consume a substantial quantity of water. Eating chia seeds can help lower triglyceride levels, which may be suitable for heart health. It is beneficial because people with diabetes generally have a greater chance of developing cardiovascular disease.

- Black Bean Salad

Black bean salad is a wholesome snack. To make it, just combine cooked black beans with chopped veggies, like onions and onions, and chuck them in a vinaigrette dressing. Since black beans are full of protein and fiber, they make a wholesome snack for diabetes people. Eating them may stop blood glucose spikes and reduce insulin levels after meals. In one study, 12 individuals consumed black beans with a meal consumed to 33 percent lower insulin levels five hours after ingestion, compared to people who didn't consume black beans. Black beans also have been shown to benefit heart health by helping lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels.

Trail Mix

Trail mix is a snack created by mixing seeds, nuts, and dried fruit. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of course mix provides nearly 4 grams of protein, making it a filling snack that may promote blood glucose control in people with diabetes. Trail mix also provides some healthy fiber and fats from the seeds and nuts, which have helped reduce blood glucose and insulin levels. The secret is to avoid adding too much-dried fruit to your trail mix because it's relatively high in sugar and might spike your blood sugar if you overeat. Additionally, it's extremely high in calories, so you should avoid eating too much trail mix simultaneously. A reasonable serving size is about a few.

- Edamame

Edamame is unripe, green soybeans that are still in their pods. They're a nutritious snack. Some animal studies have demonstrated that edamame can help lower blood glucose levels. It might also boost insulin resistance, a condition where cells can't use insulin effectively, resulting in consistently higher glucose levels.

- Homemade Protein Bars

Protein bars are a great snack alternative for diabetes individuals because of the substantial quantity of protein they supply.

- Peanut Butter Celery Sticks

A popular way to enjoy sausage sticks is by dipping them in peanut butter. It is another healthy snack choice for individuals with diabetes. Furthermore, celery includes antioxidants known as flavones, which have been analyzed for their role in lowering glucose levels. Adding a tablespoon or two (about 16--32 g ) of peanut butter to celery sticks adds a few excess fiber and protein into the snack, which will benefit your blood glucose control even more.

See: Celery Juice Benefits & Side Effects

Summary

There are loads of healthy snack choices to select from if you have diabetes. A good guideline is to choose high fiber, protein, and healthy fats to help maintain healthy glucose levels.


See: Best Foods For Diabetics & Shopping List

References

1. Dairy. (2017).http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/making-healthy-food-choices/dairy.html

2. Lifestyle management: Standards of medical care in diabetes—2019. (2019). http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/42/Supplement_1/S46

3. Smart snacks. (2015). http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/PDFs/awareness-programs/hhm/what_can_i_eat-smart_snacks-American_Diabetes_Association.pdf

4. Basic report: 01129, egg, whole, cooked, hard-boiled. (2018). https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/01129?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=egg+boiled&ds=SR&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=

5. Asif, M. (2014). The prevention and control type-2 diabetes by changing lifestyle and dietary patterns. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3977406/

6. Augustin, L. S. A., et al. (2016). Post-prandial glucose and insulin responses of hummus alone or combined with a carbohydrate food: A dose-response study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730744/

7. Basic report: 16058, chickpeas (garbanzo beans, bengal gram), mature seeds, canned, solids, and liquids. (2018). https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/16058?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=Chickpeas+%28garbanzo+beans%2C+bengal+gram%29%2C+mature+seeds%2C+canned%2C+solids+and+liquids&ds=&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=

8. Basic report: 09037, avocados, raw, all commercial varieties. (2018).

https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/09037fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=avocado&ds=SR&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=

9. Valdés-Ramos, R., et al. (2015). Vitamins and type 2 diabetes mellitus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4435229/

10. Weight loss. (n.d.). http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/weight-loss/

11. Dawn phenomenon. (2017). http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/dawn-phenomenon.html

12. Dawn Phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. (2018).

https://www.mottchildren.org/health-library/zx3495

13. Desjardins, K., et al. (2014). Are bedtime nutritional strategies effective in preventing nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24320159

14. Gulati, S., et al. (2017). Effect of almond supplementation on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians in North India with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A 24–week study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5333560/

15. Fruits. (2016). http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/making-healthy-food-choices/fruits.html

See: An Indian Diabetic Vegetarian Diet plan for Type 2 Diabetes

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