Nageen Sharma
Craniosacral therapy
Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan
Years of experience 3

Total years in practice: 3

Published Date
December 31, 2013
Abstract Authors
Brittanie M Volk, Laura J Kunces, Daniel J Freidenreich, Brian R Kupchak, Catherine Saenz, Juan C Artistizabal, Maria Luz Fernandez, Richard S Bruno, Carl M Maresh, William J Kraemer, Stephen D Phinney, Jeff S Volek
Abstract Source
PLoS One. 2014 ;9(11):e113605. Epub 2014 Nov 21. PMID: 25415333
Abstract Affiliation
Brittanie M Volk
Study Type
Research
Conditions
Heart Health
Therapies
Functional Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Nutrition, Integrative Medicine, Diet Therapy
Reference
Abstract Content
Recent meta-analyses have found no association between heart and dietary saturated fat; however, higher proportions of plasma saturated fatty acids (SFA) predict greater risk for developing type-2 diabetes and heart . These observations suggest a disconnect between dietary saturated fat and plasma SFA, but few controlled feeding studies have specifically examined how varying saturated fat intake across a broad range affects circulating SFA levels. Sixteen adults with metabolic syndrome (age 44.9±9.9 yr, BMI 37.9±6.3 kg/m2) were fed six 3-wk diets that progressively increased carbohydrate (from 47 to 346 g/day) with concomitant decreases in total and saturated fat. Despite a distinct increase in saturated fat intake from baseline to the low-carbohydrate diet (46 to 84 g/day), and then a gradual decrease in saturated fat to 32 g/day at the highest carbohydrate phase, there were no significant changes in the proportion of total SFA in any plasma lipid fractions. Whereas plasma saturated fat remained relatively stable, the proportion of palmitoleic acid in plasma triglyceride and cholesteryl ester was significantly and uniformly reduced as carbohydrate intake decreased, and then gradually increased as dietary carbohydrate was re-introduced. The results show that dietary and plasma saturated fat are not related, and that increasing dietary carbohydrate across a range of intakes promotes incremental increases in plasma palmitoleic acid, a biomarker consistently associated with adverse health outcomes.
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