Heart Disease
23 Case Studies
4 Member Stories
93 Research

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered from their problems after Heart-Disease treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of Heart-Disease and related therapies as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

July 2012

The search for complementary treatments in primary prevention of cardiovascular (CVD) is a high-priority challenge. Grape and wine polyphenol resveratrol confers CV benefits, in part by exerting anti-inflammatory effects. However, the evidence in human long-term clinical trials has yet to be established. We aimed to investigate the effects of a dietary resveratrol-rich grape supplement on the inflammatory and fibrinolytic status of subjects at high risk of CVD and treated according to current guidelines for primary prevention of CVD. Seventy-five patients undergoing primary prevention of CVD participated in this triple-blinded, randomized, parallel, dose-response, placebo-controlled, 1-year follow-up trial. Patients, allocated in 3 groups, consumed placebo (maltodextrin), a resveratrol-rich grape supplement (resveratrol 8 mg), or a conventional grape supplement lacking resveratrol, for the first 6 months and a double dose for the next 6 months. In contrast to placebo and conventional grape supplement, the resveratrol-rich grape supplement significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-26%, p = 0.03), tumor necrosis factor-? (-19.8%, p = 0.01), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (-16.8%, p = 0.03), and interleukin-6/interleukin-10 ratio (-24%, p = 0.04) and increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (19.8%, p = 0.00). Adiponectin (6.5%, p = 0.07) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (-5.7%, p = 0.06) tended to increase and decrease, respectively. No adverse effects were observed in any patient. In conclusion, 1-year consumption of a resveratrol-rich grape supplement improved the inflammatory and fibrinolytic status in patients who were on statins for primary prevention of CVD and at high CVD risk (i.e., with diabetes or hypercholesterolemia plus ?1 other CV risk factor). Our results show for the first time that a dietary intervention with grape resveratrol could complement the gold standard therapy in the primary prevention of CVD.
...more

July 2016

Background:
Potential effects of resveratrol consumption on cardiovascular risk factors and body weight in overweight/obese adults have not been fully elucidated. Our present analysis was to evaluate the effects of resveratrol consumption on risk markers related to cardiovascular health in overweight/obese Individuals.
METHODS:
Multiple literature databases were systematically searched, and 21 studies were included. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI), and heterogeneity was assessed with the I2 test. Publication bias and subgroup analyses were also performed.
Results:
There were variations in reporting quality of included studies. Resveratrol intervention significantly lowered total cholesterol (WMD, -0.19 mmol/L; 95% CI, -0.32 to -0.06; P = 0.004), systolic blood pressure (WMD, -2.26 mmHg; 95% CI, -4.82 to -0.49; P = 0.02), and fasting glucose (WMD, -0.22 mmol/L; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.03; P = 0.03). Heterogeneity was noted for these outcomes (35.6%, 38.7% and 71.4%, respectively). Our subgroup analysis showed significant reductions in total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose, and insulin in subjects ingesting higher dose of resveratrol (?300 mg/day).
Conclusion:
Our finding provides evidence that daily resveratrol consumption might be a candidate as an adjunct to pharmacological management to better prevent and control cardiovascular in overweight/obese individuals.
...more

January 2010

Elevated asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It has been shown that alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) improves endothelial function and oxidative stress in these patients. The present study investigated if ALA reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Plasma concentrations of ADMA, L-arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were determined in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in patients with T2DM. Intravenous ALA (n = 16) or placebo (n = 14) was administered daily for 3 weeks. ALA reduced ADMA while no change was observed with placebo (mean change -0.05 micromol/1[95% CI: -0.01; -0.09] vs. 0.01 micromol/1 [95% CI: -0.05; -0.03]; ANOVA p = 0.031). SDMA and L-arginine were not affected by ALA. In conclusion ALA treatment reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Long-term studies need to demonstrate if ALA may cause cardiovascular risk reduction.
...more

December 2004

CONTEXT: Diuretic-based therapy is at least as effective as newer classes of agents for hypertension. However, many patients with hypertension require treatment with more than 1 drug class to achieve blood pressure control. The relative benefits or risks of 2-drug-class combinations are not well known. OBJECTIVE:
To prospectively evaluate if there are differences in cardiovascular mortality among postmenopausal women with hypertension but no history of cardiovascular (CVD) treated with different classes of antihypertensive agents, singly or in combination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Women with hypertension enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a longitudinal multicenter cohort study of 93 676 women aged 50 to 79 years at baseline (1994-1998), assessed for a mean of 5.9 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relationship between baseline use of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics, or a combination of these, and incidence of coronary heart , stroke, and CVD mortality.
Results:
Among 30,219 women with hypertension but no history of CVD, 19,889 were receiving pharmacological antihypertensive treatment, of whom 11,294 (57%) [corrected] were receiving monotherapy with an ACE inhibitor, beta-blocker, calcium channel blocker, or diuretic, and 4493 (23%) were treated at baseline with a combination of diuretic plus either ACE inhibitor, beta-blocker, or calcium channel blocker or ACE inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker. Monotherapy with calcium channel blockers vs diuretics was associated with greater risk of CVD death (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.35), controlling for multiple covariates. Women treated with a diuretic plus a calcium channel blocker had an 85% greater risk of CVD death vs those treated with a diuretic plus a beta-blocker, after adjustment for age, race, smoking, high cholesterol levels requiring medication, body mass index, physical activity, use of hormone therapy, and diabetes. After exclusion of women with diabetes the hazard ratio was 2.16 (95% confidence interval, 1.16-4.03). Analyses adjusting for propensity to be receiving a particular treatment did not change the results. For morbid events of coronary heart or stroke, diuretics plus ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers did not differ from diuretics plus beta-blockers. CONCLUSIONS: Among women with hypertension but no history of CVD, a 2-drug-class regimen of calcium channel blockers plus diuretics was associated with a higher risk of CVD mortality vs beta-blockers plus diuretics. Risks were similar for ACE inhibitors plus diuretics and beta-blockers plus diuretics. Monotherapy with diuretics was equal or superior to other monotherapy in preventing CVD complications of high blood pressure.
...more

January 2010

Background:
Recent evidence supports the protective effects of n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids (n-3 FAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on vascular function. OBJECTIVE:
We investigated the effects of EPA and DHA on postprandial vascular function in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
DESIGN:
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover manner, 34 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus received daily either 2 g purified EPA/DHA (termed n-3 FAs) or olive oil (placebo) for 6 wk. At the end of this period, we measured macrovascular (brachial ultrasound of flow-mediated dilatation; FMD) and microvascular [laser-Doppler measurements of reactive hyperemia (RH) of the hand] function at fasting and 2, 4, and 6 h after a high-fat meal (600 kcal, 21 g protein, 41 g carbohydrates, 40 g fat).
Results:
Fasting vascular function remained unchanged after n-3 FAs and placebo. Postprandial FMD decreased from fasting after placebo, with a maximum decrease (38%) at 4 h-an effect that was significantly reduced (P = 0.03 for time x treatment interaction) by n-3 FA supplementation (maximum decrease in FMD was at 4 h: 13%). RH remained unchanged after placebo, whereas it improved significantly (P = 0.04 for time x treatment interaction) after n-3 FA supplementation (maximum increase was at 2 h: 27%). CONCLUSIONS: In subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 6 wk of supplementation with n-3 FAs reduced the postprandial decrease in macrovascular function relative to placebo. Moreover, n-3 FA supplementation improved postprandial microvascular function. These observations suggest a protective vascular effect of n-3 FAs.
...more

March 2005

Background:
Randomized trials have shown that low-dose aspirin decreases the risk of a first myocardial infarction in men, with little effect on the risk of ischemic stroke. There are few similar data in women.
METHODS:
We randomly assigned 39,876 initially healthy women 45 years of age or older to receive 100 mg of aspirin on alternate days or placebo and then monitored them for 10 years for a first major cardiovascular event (i.e., nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes).
Results:
During follow-up, 477 major cardiovascular events were confirmed in the aspirin group, as compared with 522 in the placebo group, for a nonsignificant reduction in risk with aspirin of 9 percent (relative risk, 0.91; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 1.03; P=0.13). With regard to individual end points, there was a 17 percent reduction in the risk of stroke in the aspirin group, as compared with the placebo group (relative risk, 0.83; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.69 to 0.99; P=0.04), owing to a 24 percent reduction in the risk of ischemic stroke (relative risk, 0.76; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.93; P=0.009) and a nonsignificant increase in the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk, 1.24; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.87; P=0.31). As compared with placebo, aspirin had no significant effect on the risk of fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction (relative risk, 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.84 to 1.25; P=0.83) or death from cardiovascular causes (relative risk, 0.95; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.22; P=0.68). Gastrointestinal bleeding requiring transfusion was more frequent in the aspirin group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 1.40; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.83; P=0.02). Subgroup analyses showed that aspirin significantly reduced the risk of major cardiovascular events, ischemic stroke, and myocardial infarction among women 65 years of age or older. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, primary-prevention trial among women, aspirin lowered the risk of stroke without affecting the risk of myocardial infarction or death from cardiovascular causes, leading to a nonsignificant finding with respect to the primary end point.
...more
Get a Consultation
(650) 539-4545
Get more information via email