Acupuncture
321 Case Studies
147 Member Stories
36 Research

Around the world over thousands of years, patients have received root-cause holistic treatment for their diseases with personalized treatment, diet and lifestyle modification recommendations. Read the inspiring true stories of practitioners who heal people and who recovered from their problems after Acupuncture treatment at their clinics. Many have been generous to share their knowledge and experience for the benefit of other holistic experts and patients alike. Many practitioners share their Case Studies and the healing powers of Acupuncture and related therapies as they heal people who benefited from our expertise.

March 2019

Background

Patients with retinitis pigmentosa are motivated to try complementary or integrative therapies to slow disease progression. Basic science, clinical research and retinitis pigmentosa patients' self‐reports support the hypothesis that acupuncture may improve visual function.

Methods

A prospective, case series, pilot study enrolled 12 adult patients with RP treated at an academic medical centre with a standardised protocol that combined electroacupuncture to the forehead and below the eyes and acupuncture to the body, at 10 half‐hour sessions over two weeks. Pre‐ and post‐treatment tests included Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity (VA), Pelli‐Robson contrast sensitivity (CS), Goldmann visual fields, and dark‐adapted full‐field stimulus threshold (FST)(n = 9). Scotopic Sensitivity Tester‐1 (SST‐1) dark‐adaptometry was performed on the last two subjects.

Results

Six of 12 subjects had measurable, significant visual function improvements after treatment. Three of nine subjects tested with the FST had a significant 10.3 to 17.5 dB (that is, 13‐ to 53‐fold) improvement in both eyes at one week after acupuncture, maintained for at least 10 to 12 months, which was well outside typical test‐retest variability (95% CI: 3–3.5 dB) previously found in retinitis pigmentosa. SST‐1 dark‐adaptation was shortened in both subjects tested on average by 48.5 per cent at one week (range 36 to 62 per cent across 10 to 30 dB), which was outside typical coefficients of variation of less than 30 per cent previously determined in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and normals. Four of the five subjects with psychophysically measured scotopic sensitivity improvements reported subjective improvements in vision at night or in dark environments. One subject had 0.2 logMAR improvement in VA; another had 0.55 logCS improvement. Another subject developed more than 20 per cent improvement in the area of the Goldmann visual fields. The acupuncture protocol was completed and well tolerated by all, without adverse events or visual loss.

Conclusions

Acupuncture entails minimal risk, if administered by a well‐trained acupuncturist and may have significant, measurable benefits on residual visual function in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, in particular scotopic sensitivity, which had not previously been studied. These preliminary findings support the need for future controlled studies of potential mechanisms.

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January 2017

BACKGROUND:
Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer.
METHODS:
A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data.
RESULTS:
We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events.
CONCLUSIONS:
Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.
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July 2011

OBJECTIVE:
To compare the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), acupuncture, and hormone therapy on menopause- related symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal women.
STUDY DESIGN:
Fifty-seven Chinese women completed 2 months of treatment with either CHM (5 g twice daily, n = 22), acupuncture plus CHM (Kun Bao Wan) 5 g twice daily plus sessions of acupuncture, n = 20), or hormone therapy (n = 15).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Kupperman index score, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol, and the number of symptoms before and after treatment were the main outcome measures.
RESULTS:
CHM, acupuncture plus CHM, and hormone therapy significantly decreased Kupperman score (P < .001 in each group) and number of symptoms (P < .05). The mean difference in Kupperman score between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly varied (P = .02). The difference was only between acupuncture plus CHM and CHM with significantly better results by acupuncture plus CHM. Acupuncture plus CHM, as well as hormone therapy, significantly reduced the level of FSH (P < .05), but CHM alone didn't cause any significant decrease in FSH levels (P > .05). The mean difference in the level of FSH between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly different (P = .02). This difference was only between CHM and hormone therapy with significantly better results by hormone therapy. The three treatments didn't make any significant increase in the level of E2 (P > .05).
CONCLUSION:
Application of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture proved as effective as hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms, and it achieved better outcomes than herbal medicine alone.
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July 2018

Background

Patients with retinitis pigmentosa are motivated to try complementary or integrative therapies to slow disease progression. Basic science, clinical research and retinitis pigmentosa patients' self‐reports support the hypothesis that acupuncture may improve visual function.


Methods

A prospective, case series, pilot study enrolled 12 adult patients with RP treated at an academic medical centre with a standardised protocol that combined electroacupuncture to the forehead and below the eyes and acupuncture to the body, at 10 half‐hour sessions over two weeks. Pre‐ and post‐treatment tests included Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity (VA), Pelli‐Robson contrast sensitivity (CS), Goldmann visual fields, and dark‐adapted full‐field stimulus threshold (FST)(n = 9). Scotopic Sensitivity Tester‐1 (SST‐1) dark‐adaptometry was performed on the last two subjects.


Results

Six of 12 subjects had measurable, significant visual function improvements after treatment. Three of nine subjects tested with the FST had a significant 10.3 to 17.5 dB (that is, 13‐ to 53‐fold) improvement in both eyes at one week after acupuncture, maintained for at least 10 to 12 months, which was well outside typical test‐retest variability (95% CI: 3–3.5 dB) previously found in retinitis pigmentosa. SST‐1 dark‐adaptation was shortened in both subjects tested on average by 48.5 per cent at one week (range 36 to 62 per cent across 10 to 30 dB), which was outside typical coefficients of variation of less than 30 per cent previously determined in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and normals. Four of the five subjects with psychophysically measured scotopic sensitivity improvements reported subjective improvements in vision at night or in dark environments. One subject had 0.2 logMAR improvement in VA; another had 0.55 logCS improvement. Another subject developed more than 20 per cent improvement in the area of the Goldmann visual fields. The acupuncture protocol was completed and well tolerated by all, without adverse events or visual loss.

Conclusions

Acupuncture entails minimal risk, if administered by a well‐trained acupuncturist and may have significant, measurable benefits on residual visual function in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, in particular scotopic sensitivity, which had not previously been studied. These preliminary findings support the need for future controlled studies of potential mechanisms.


...more

November 2010

OBJECTIVES:
Functional constipation (FC) is a common clinical complaint. Despite a lack of consolidated evidence, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has become a popular alternative treatment for this condition. The aim of this study was to assess, with a rigidly designed study, the efficacy and safety of a CHM proprietary medicine, Hemp Seed Pill (HSP), in optimal dosage for treating FC.
METHODS:
This study comprised two parts: trial I, a dose determination study, and trial II, a placebo-controlled clinical study. In trial I, the optimal dosage of HSP was first determined from among three doses (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5?g b.i.d.). In trial II, a randomized double-blind study, the efficacy and safety of HSP for FC patients (Rome III criteria) in excessive syndrome as defined by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory were compared with placebo. All participants in trials underwent a 2-week run-in, an 8-week treatment, and an 8-week follow-up. The primary end point was the responder rate for complete spontaneous bowel movement (CSBM) during treatment. Participants with a mean increase of CSBM ?1/week compared with their baselines were defined as responders. Secondary outcome measures included responder rate during follow-up, individual and global symptom assessments, and reported adverse effects (AEs).
Results:
The dose of 7.5?g b.i.d. showed better therapeutic effect than that of 2.5 and 5.0?g b.i.d. among 96 subjects (32 per arm) in trial I and was therefore selected for comparison with placeboin trial II. In trial II, 120 subjects were randomized into two arms (60 per arm). Responder rates for the HSP and placebo groups were 43.3 and 8.3% during treatment and 30.0 and 15.0% in the follow-up period, respectively (P
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January 2005

This study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, in stabilizing postpartum psychological state. We enrolled 268 women who had a normal delivery in Osaka Medical College Hospital or its affiliated clinics and randomly assigned them to the following two groups: a group of 134 women who received Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) at a dose of 6.0 g/day and another group of 134 women without Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) (control group). We observed 2.06-fold and 1.67-fold higher incidences of depressive mood and nervousness, respectively, after delivery in the control group than in the Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) group. Within 3 weeks of postpartum, there was a significant difference in the incidences of maternity blues between the Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) group (15.7%; 21/134) and the control group (32.1%; 43/134) (p = 0.0195). No adverse effects were observed in this study. The results of this study demonstrate the beneficial clinical effects of Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) in stabilizing psychological state in the postpartum period. Xiong-gui-tiao-xue-yin (Kyuki-chouketsu-in) can be expected to improve the mental health of women in the postpartum period and prevent maternity blues.
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