Weight Training and Lifting for Diabetics




Are you diabetic? If so, you’re not alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1 in 10 American adults have diabetes, and 86 million showed signs of having prediabetes in 2012.1   The most common type of diabetes in the U.S. is Type 2 diabetes, which is 90-95% of all documented cases. One way to effectively deal with type 2 diabetes is by weight training.




 











 Health Benefits of Weight Training and Lifting for Diabetes: 


 Weight training has many health benefits for type 2 diabetes:


·         Weight loss


·         Improved response to insulin


·         Decreased risk of heart disease


·         Improved use of blood sugar


 The more time a person spends weight training, their risk of having type 2 diabetes decreases. According to study in the Journal of the American Medical Association: 


·         Strength training for less than 59 minutes per week reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 12 percent.2 


·         Strength training for 60-149 minutes per week reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent.2


·         Strength training for at least 150 minutes per week reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 34 percent.2


 The reason strength training is so effective for type 2 diabetes is it is one of the fastest ways to lower insulin and leptin resistance. A person can reap these benefits for just 15 minutes per day of strength training exercises.


 Compound Movements for Type 2 Diabetes


 The most effective strength training exercises for type 2 diabetics involve compound exercises. These are exercises that work several muscle groups at once. By performing several compound exercises in short but intense 15 minute workout sessions, a person can decrease their risk of type 2 diabetes and reap the many other health benefits of strength training. While insulin is often prescribed to treat diabetes, weight training and weight lifting for diabetes may be just what the doctor ordered. consult with the personal trainer who can help you personalize weight training weight lifting exercises to help with your diabetes.


 





Recent studies by National Institute of health have shown substantial evidence that correlates weight training and lifting with reduced risk of diabetes type 2. Studies were conclusive to say that weight training independent of aerobic exercises was attributed to lower risk of diabetes 2. 

References:

1. http://www.m.webmd.com/diabetes/strength-training-diabetes

2. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/mobile/article.aspx?articleid=1307571

3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22868691

4. https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/diabetes.html

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